Brainshift: how our perceptions alter

Under particular circumstances (involving high anxiety or a major reward) our brains cause us to perceive the world around us in ways that contradict and distort objective reality. It's when we're most likely going to do something regrettable.

This shift in perception is unrelated to our intelligence, morals, or past behaviors. We don’t even know it’s happening, nor can we control it.

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The science of regrettable decisions

vox.com

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Psychologists call this “the anchoring bias.”

After we’ve made a decision, even an illogical one, we tend to cling to it. That is, we filter out dissenting information while seeking data that confirms our original viewpoints.

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  • Be aware that we are all vulnerable to the consequences of brainshift, regardless of our ethics, social status, or IQ.
  • Know the situations that stoke your fears and desires: Those involving money, sex, and fame/recognition are good places to start.
  • Answer to these questions: What’s the worst thing that could happen? How would I feel if that outcome occurred?

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Sarcasm is like a truth-lie

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Cognitive Biases: Anchoring And Our Relationships With Buying Stuff

When we walk into a store and see an Ultra HD Television costing upwards of $40,000, we usually feel as if it’s a complete waste of money and start to look at the other bargain options in the $1500 range. While we may think we are smart shoppers, we have been manipulated.

Anchoring is a cognitive bias where the initial figure that is provided to our minds distorts our thinking and influences our subsequent buying decision. The $1500 TV wouldn’t look so enticing and cheap if we didn’t see the expensive one before. In fact, if the first TV we saw was for $500, then the $1500 TV would look expensive.

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theconversation.com