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7 Proven Ways to Redirect Stress Into a Powerful Success Motivator

Ruminating and problem-solving

When you find yourself stuck on something and are rehashing it in your mind, ask yourself whether you’re ruminating or actually problem-solving. 

Make sure that you’re focused on seeking solutions, thinking about ways to mitigate an issue or how to prevent problems from blowing up even bigger.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

7 Proven Ways to Redirect Stress Into a Powerful Success Motivator

7 Proven Ways to Redirect Stress Into a Powerful Success Motivator

https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/326644

entrepreneur.com

8

Key Ideas

Stress and motivation

Used effectively, stress can motivate us to accomplish more than we had imagined possible. Stress can jolt us to reach our potential. Without stress, we’d feel rudderless and without purpose.

However, while a little stress can help us stay motivated, chronic stress can leave us irritable, depressed, distracted and anxious. 

Not all stress is bad for you

  • “Good stress”: which psychologists refer to as “eustress,” is the stress we feel when we’re excited about something.
  • Acute stress: when something surprises us or catches us off guard. Acute stress is the body’s response to ensure you react and take measures to deal with the unexpected situation. It has no lasting negative effects if we deal with it quickly and move on.

Build your resilience

Resilience is how we deal with stress effectively so we “bounce back” after a difficult time.

As we deal with issues that cause tension and strain, we learn to face adversity, deal with significant issues and overcome problems. We learn how to formulate realistic plans and carry them out.

Deal with chronic stress

Even “good stress” left to fester unresolved for too long can turn into bad, chronic stress.

Tap into your support system by reaching out to friends and loved ones. With assistance from others, you’ll can face challenges and problems head-on. Doing so will give you a sense of accomplishment and resolution.

Recognize your limits

The golden rule for dealing with stress is knowing when to say no.

You have to learn to refrain from accepting more commitments than you are capable of handling. Don’t kill yourself trying to make everyone happy and squeeze everything in.

Determine what you can control

There’s a lot that’s completely out of your control but . In fact, all you have direct control over is yourself and your actions.

You have sway and influence over a variety of other things, but you can only completely control yourself. So stay in control of yourself and don't blame others for your actions.

Ruminating and problem-solving

When you find yourself stuck on something and are rehashing it in your mind, ask yourself whether you’re ruminating or actually problem-solving. 

Make sure that you’re focused on seeking solutions, thinking about ways to mitigate an issue or how to prevent problems from blowing up even bigger.

Find the opportunity

Stress is indicative of change: something is happening and you’re forced to respond to that demand. 

Try to condition yourself to see stress as an opportunity and use it to your advantage. Stress can help you embrace change and make any necessary modifications. Stressful situations force us to make adjustments, innovate and be creative.

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Resilience

It's the skill that enables us to recover quickly from difficulties. It means adapting well in the face of trauma, tragedy or significant stress.

We build our resilience by learni...

Build a circle of trust

The primary factor in resilience is having supportive relationships, inside and outside the family. 

Close friends, family and loved ones represent our social support; they encourage and motivate us, and let us know that we aren’t alone.

Reframe stressful situations

The way we view a potentially stressful situation can either make the crisis worse in our mind or minimize it. 

Reframing things in a more positive way can alter our perceptions and relieve our stressful feelings.

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Self-sabotage
Self-sabotage occurs when your logical, conscious mind (the side of you that says you need to eat healthily and save money) is at odds with your subconscious mind (the side of you that stress-eats cho...
Understand self-sabotage

Self-destructive behaviors can become habits and can continually undermine your success and happiness.

Self-sabotage is when we want something, but somehow we never accomplish it, because somewhere deep in our subconscious we’re fighting against that goal:

  • Our disorganization distracts us.
  • We’re constantly overthinking all of our decisions.
Recognize self-sabotaging habits
  • Procrastination. Start setting deadlines and mini-deadlines to work toward your objective.
  • Negative self-talk/negative thinking. Be patient with yourself; be kind to yourself. Work to build yourself up.
  • Perfectionism. It is an impossible standard that keeps you from moving forward.

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Classical Music

Listening to classical music can help people perform tasks more efficiently. 

The absence of words in the music may be one factor, as songs that contain lyrics have been found to ...

“The Mozart Effect”

This theory suggests that listening to classical composers can enhance brain activity and act as a catalyst for improving health and well-being.

Nature Music

Listening to the sounds of nature (waves crashing or a babbling brook) has been shown to boost moods and focus. They also help mask harsher, more distracting noises, such as people talking or typing

Nature sounds work best when they’re soothing sounds (flowing water or rainfall, while more jarring noises (bird calls and animal noises) can be distracting.

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Resilience

It is our ability to survive and flourish through our traumas, stressors, responsibility shifts and challenges offered by life.

Self-Respecting

To be resilient, you must develop the ability to self-soothe when things get tough.

When things are in a particularly stressful place, you must tap into your will, motivation, and pliability to continue moving forward.

Emotionally Driven

Resilient people are not needy, desperate or overly reactive. 

They carry a relaxed attitude and view rejection as a new direction opportunity. They don’t get down when challenged, they commit to getting up. They do not depend upon others for our resources. 

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Slow down

Try not to react immediately, but be patient and gather as much information as possible.

If the problem will not matter a year from now, distance yourself somewhat from the situation to gain ...

Stay positive

When you are in a stressful situation, do not allow your mind to imagine the worst-case scenario. 

Focus your mind on something positive.

Never ask “what if?”

The "what if" line of questioning induces panic and lets you focus on imagined situations that escalate the problem.

Focus on the facts and work on a solution.

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Stress causes health problems
Stress causes health problems

We’re all under stress right now. And the stress-reactive circuits in our brain guide us to respond ineffectively to stress and cause chronic stress and rising rates of emotional, behavioral, socia...

Understanding the emotional brain
  • The neural circuits in our emotional brain - the limbic system and subconscious memory systems - control our emotional responses in daily life.
  • When a stimulus arrives in the brain, it activates either stress-resilient circuits, the internal calmers and healers, or stress-reactive circuits.
  • The brain activates the strongest circuit, which controls our responses.
  • If the strongest circuit is the reactive circuit, our strong emotions get the upper hand, and the stress interferes with the part of our brain responsible for higher-level thinking and planning.
  • The longer the stress-reactive circuit is activated, the more likely they are to activate other stress-reactive wires, which can cause an emotional meltdown of anxiety, numbness, depression, and hostility.
Retrain the stressed brain

The brain learns to be resilient by being resilient. It takes becoming stressed, then use emotional techniques to change the unreasonable expectations stored in that circuit.

  • One technique is to complain briefly. It activates the reactive wire that has encoded an incorrect response.
  • Then rapidly express emotions, starting with a burst of anger (which decreases stress). You can then stay present to your strong, negative emotions. Talk to yourself through finishing phrases like " I feel afraid that..." or "I feel sad that..."

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The three why’s

Before acting on a decision, ask yourself “Why?” Follow up your response with another “Why?” And then a third. 

If you can find three good reasons to pursue something, you’ll have clarit...

Expand your emotional vocabulary

Putting your feelings into words has a therapeutic effect on your brain; if you’re unable to articulate how you feel, that can create stress. 

Practice saying 'no' to yourself

The ability to say “no” to yourself to put off short-term gratification ( from daily temptations like social media or junk food) for the long-term gain is an important life-skill. 

Like a muscle, it is strengthened with exercise

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Sense of self

You have to know who you are and what you want. 

Self-improvement begins with a keen awareness of who you are and what are your values, beliefs and the larger purpose you wish to ...

Sense of curiosity

Curiosity creates a longing to know more, do more and be more.

To have a successful life, you have to cultivate your sense of wonder and be curious about what the future might hold. Curiosity helps you see any situation as an opportunity for your advancement and learning.

Sense of direction

It improves your ability to prioritize and it makes decision-making easier.

It also provides commitment: it's usually hard to commit to something that has no foreseeable future.

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Cut out low-value activities

Many of us are working longer hours than we should be just because we are wasting time on low-value activities.

Track your time for a few days to identify your distractors and the low-...

Schedule recurring social activities

Having an active social life is crucial to your health. People who isolate themselves from others could increase their risk of death by about 50 percent. 

If you have a busy life, schedule recurring social activities with your closest friends, monthly.  Plan your work schedule around your social calendar instead of the other way around.

Learn to cope with stress

The key to finding the balance between work and health is learning how to cope with stress.

Get in the habit of stepping away from the stressful situation for a few moments to calm down and collect your thoughts: step away from the computer or spend a few minutes walking outside.

Benefits of a learning culture

During the last recession, companies that invested in their employees, in part by providing the training they needed to move forward in their careers, enjoyed profit gains of 26 percent, compared t...

When hiring, screen for learners
  • Ask about passion projects. Learners tend to pursue something else outside work (training for a marathon, playing with a band, etc.)
  • Focus on curiosity as much as hard skills. Bring up problems currently facing the team and see how the candidate responds.
  • One of the most important things to a learning mindset is the ability to admit you don't know something. So be aware of how they approach the things they don't understand.
Learning as a company policy

This means explicitly defining ongoing learning as a core company value.

Empowering employees can mean providing the time or money to enable learning - in other words, offering learning opportunities as a job benefit like health insurance. 

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