Snapchat dysmorphia

The term ‘Snapchat dysmorphia’ was coined in 2015 to describe the growing numbers of people who wanted to look like they’d been put through a face-altering filter in real life, all big eyes and sparkling skin.

Before that, a patient might turn up at a plastic surgeon’s office with photos of a celebrity they wanted to look like clipped from a magazine. Even before the rise of social media, psychologists found that people who stared at themselves in a mirror became more self-conscious.

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Zoom dysmorphia is following us into the real world

wired.co.uk

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Front-facing cameras have distorted our self-image

In the age of Zoom, people became unusually preoccupied with sagging skin around their neck and jowls; with the size and shape of their nose; with the pallor of their skin.

There is a spike in cosmetic interventions, ranging from Botox and fillers to face-lifts and nose jobs.

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Unlike with Snapchat, where people are aware that they’re viewing themselves through a filter, video conferencing distorts our appearance in ways we might not even realize.:

  • Front-facing cameras distort your image, like a funhouse mirror. They make noes look bigger and eyes look smaller. This effect is exacerbated by proximity to the lens, which is generally nearer to you than a person would ever stand in a real-life conversation. Looking down at a smartphone or laptop camera is the least flattering angle.
  • We’re also used to seeing our own reflection when our faces are relaxed – the concentrated frown (or bored expression) you wear in a Zoom meeting jars with the image of yourself you’re used to seeing in the mirror..

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Our mental image

Our self-image help determine how we react to the daily ups and downs of life. If we think of ourselves as valued, other people will also notice that quality.

Think about how you would describe yourself to a stranger. Would you point to your keen sense of humour or good physical features? Or would you refer to your supposed "trouble areas?" Your answer mostly depends on your mental image of yourself.

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How accurate is our mental image of ourselves?

science.howstuffworks.com

Vitamin D and sunshine

Vitamin D is essential for calcium absorption and many other biological processes. Lower levels of Vitamin D increase the rates of almost every disease like cancer, diabetes, osteoporosis, cognitive impairment, autoimmune conditions and more.

Vitamin D is a hormone manufactured by the skin when you are in the sun. It is difficult to obtain enough through diet. 

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The Shady Link Between Sunscreen and Your Health

outsideonline.com

Working virtually is taxing
  • Since shifting into a more virtual work situation our workday has been proven to be lengthed by more than an hour and meetings extended for a full 10 minutes longer.
  • As we feed into these longer working hours it causes us to have higher chances for cognitive overhead. We may not be aware of it but our brains aren't wired to look at a flat image of a person on a grid.
  • Our brain produces beta waves every time we process a lot of information at once and then our brain starts to slow down.

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Is there an antidote to 'digital intensity'?

bbc.com