Role in heart health - Deepstash
Role in heart health

Role in heart health

  • In a study of 1500 people, we observed the gut microbiome may have a role in our heart health. 
  • Certain species of microbes contributed to the elevated levels of good cholesterol (HDL) and triglycerides. 
  • Other species of microbes seemed to be unhealthy by producing trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO). 
  • TMAO is a chemical contributing to blocked arteries causing heart attacks or stroke. 
  • TMAO production is increased when we eat foods high in choline and L-carnitine – in other words red meat and other animal-based products. 
  • Lactobacilli bacteria, found in fermented foods, may reduce cholesterol. 

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Role in brain health
  • The gut microbiome may produce chemicals affecting our brains. 
  • For example, serotonin, a good-feel chemical/neurotransimiter is mostly produced in the gut. 
  • Microbes may help its production. 
  • The gut is connected to the brain through numerous nerves.
  •  The gut microbiome can affect our brain health through these nerves. 
  • Certain psychological diorders are attributed to the gut microbiome. 

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Role in blood sugar level
  • The gut microbiome may influence blood sugar level. 
  • In a study of 33 infants with high risk of getting type 1 diabetes, the diversity of infants' microbiome decreased before getting type 1 diabetes. 
  • The number of unhealthy microbes also increased. 
  • People eating the same foods had different blood sugar levels after the meals. 
  • It may be caused by the difference in the gut microbes in each person. 

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Fun facts
  • Most microbes in your body live in your intestines, more specifically in the cecum, in the large intestine. 
  • There are about 40 trillion bacteria, compared to your own cell count, 30 trillion. 
  • The total amount of microbes contributes to your body weight about 1–2 kg. 
  • From textbooks, we usually learn that women's wombs are sterile, but they are not.

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How they affect our weight?
  • In many studies involving identical twins, we observed that the one with obesity has different gut microbiome than the other with healthy weight. 
  • Consequently, differences between gut microbiome are not genetic.
  • In a mice study, we transferred the microbiome of the obese twin to a group of normal weight mice. The group gained more weight than the other group (of mice with normal weight) receiving the microbiome from the lean twin. 
  • We conclude, gut dysbiosis may play a role in weight gain. 

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General functions of microbiome
  • Digest the healthy sugars in breast milk which are essential for normal growth for babies. 
  • Digest dietary fiber, producing short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) which positively affect our health. 
  • Controlling immune system, thus possibly enhancing our body's immunity to infections. 
  • Gut microbiome can affect our brain health, either positively or negatively.  

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Why care your gut bugs?
  • There more microbes in your gut than your cells in your body
  • Various diseases are linked to gut health. 
  • Some of which: irritable bowel syndrome, obesity, heart disease, diabetes, depression and other mental disorders.  
  • Best way to improve your gut health is by adding more plant-based whole foods to your diet. 

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Gut dysbiosis

Gut dysbiosis is a term referring to the imbalance between good and bad microbes in our gut.

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Definition of the gut microbiome

Gut microbiome is a word describing microbes – viruses, bacteria, fungi, archaea etc. – which live in your gut. Usually, gut bacteria are the microbes that mostly affect our wellbeing. (Partly because we have only studied bacteria most thoroughly.)

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How to improve your microbiome profile?

Eat a diverse range of plant-based whole foods. 

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Gut Microbiome
  1. The term “gut microbiome” refers specifically to the microorganisms living in your intestines.
  2. A person has about 300 to 500 different species of bacteria in their digestive tract.
  3. While some microorganisms are harmful to our health, many are incredibly beneficial and even necessary to a healthy body.
  4. Having a wide variety of these good bacteria in your gut can enhance your immune system function, improve symptoms of depression, help combat obesity, and provide numerous other benefits.

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Fiber gap

Only 5 percent of people in the US meet the Institute of Medicine’s recommended daily target of 25 grams for women and 38 grams for men. That amounts to a population-wide deficiency.

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Western vs. Mediterranean diet

Western diet, typically high in animal fat and protein and low in fibre, increases the risk of cancer. The Mediterranean diet is high in fibre and low in red meat and has been likened with anti-inflammatory effects and an improved immune system.

This leads us to the conclusion that gut health, favoured by fibre, is a reason for longevity of people following the Mediterranean diet.

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