Use Systems

Use Systems

First, stop relying on willpower and motivation. Both are finite and fickle resources that will abandon you when you need them most.

Use systems and outside forces to make the routine even easier to build. 

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@lau_w

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Health

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Whether you’re breaking a bad habit or starting a new one, begin by recognizing the cue that triggers the habit. Once you recognize or pick the cue, you can start working on fixing the routine (action).
Ready to Build a Healthy Habit

Do less. Do way less. Keep your goals SMALL and simple. Only build one habit at a time.

Want to start exercising more? For that first week, ONLY go for a walk for just 5 minutes every morning. Literally 5 minutes.

Want to start cooking your own healthy meals? Just aim for one meal per day or one meal per week. Whatever works for you and your schedule.

Make the Reward Momentum Building

Create rewards that reward you back! DON’T reward your routine (running!) with an unhealthy reward (cake!). That’s “one step forward, two steps back.” 

DO reward your routine (running for 5 minutes every day for 30 days straight) with a reward that makes you want to keep running (a snazzy new pair of running shoes).

Struggling To Build Healthy Habits
  • We tend to bite off more than we can chew, go too fast too soon, and then get overwhelmed too quickly.
  • We’re conditioned these days to expect and receive instant gratification.
  • We expect to get in shape very quickly, not remembering that it took us decades of unhealthy living to get where we are.
  • We miss a workout because life gets busy.

There are 3 parts to a good or bad habit: Cue (what triggers the action), Routine (the action itself), Reward (the positive result because of the action).

You have trained your brain to take a cue (you see a doughnut), anticipate a reward (a sugar high), and make the behavior automatic (nom that donut). 

Compare that to a cue (you see your running shoes), anticipate a reward (a runner’s high), and make the behavior automatic (go for a run!).

  1. Find a friend or group of friends to build the habits with you.
  2. Cultivate discipline with consequences: Every time I skip ______________ this month, I will pay $50 to my wife/husband/friend.
  3. Never miss two in a row.
  4. Don't pick the habits you hate. 
  5. Consider combining a habit you dislike with something you LOVE, and you’ll be more likely to build the habit.  Allow yourself an hour of watching Netflix, but ONLY while you’re on the Elliptical.
Your “Big Why”

As you’re determining the habits or resolutions you’re trying to set, make the habit part of a bigger cause that’s worth the struggle.

You’re not just going to the gym, you’re building a new body that you’re not ashamed of so you can start dating again.

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RELATED IDEAS

When planning on building new habits, one easy way to integrate them into your everyday routine is by actually adding them to an already existing habit. 

Therefore, choose one habit you have had for quite a while now and associate a new routine to it. You might be surprised by how fast you will get used to doing both at the same time, without feeling the most recent one as a burden.

5

IDEAS

Our habits have the power to enable us, most of the time, to live a more organized life. However, we might find it quite challenging when it comes to establishing new habits, as they require time and strong will. 

We should start by taking small steps every day in order to get used to eventually taking big ones for longer periods of time.

Force yourself to do things

Our mind has muscles. It memorizes patterns. By doing this over and over, you're building your willpower and self-discipline. 

Forcing yourself to do things that you don't feel like doing (but you know you should be doing) is a habit you can learn.

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