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8 Tips for a Smooth Transition into a New Job

Set goals

Ask yourself what you must accomplish in your first three months, what you want to accomplish in the future, and how you plan to continually improve your efficiency. These are just a few questions to set you off in the right direction. 

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

8 Tips for a Smooth Transition into a New Job

8 Tips for a Smooth Transition into a New Job

https://www.businessinsider.com/8-tips-for-a-smooth-transition-into-a-new-job-2013-2?IR=T

businessinsider.com

8

Key Ideas

Stay positive

While you may be thrilled to take this next step in your career, transitioning into a new position is likely to come with a few obstacles.

It's important to keep your chin up and endure the change with a positive attitude. Showcasing your enthusiasm will likely draw in your co-workers and make initial interactions a bit smoother.

Find your routine

Returning to work might initially be a challenge in terms of finding your footing with your new tasks. 

Actively attempting to build and manage a routine will allow you to increase your efficiency and effectiveness, as well as create a sense of normality.

Immerse yourself in company culture

Fitting in at a new job often means observing the overall culture of the company and adapting. 

Openly embrace the culture of your new company by making the office norms your new habits.

Take notes

Take both physical and mental notes on what goes on around you. 

While you're immersing yourself in the culture of the company, also familiarize yourself with some of the other norms. How does your boss react to certain things? What are the problems you can provide solutions to? Take a "fly on the wall" mentality while you're settling in to see how the company functions.

Set goals

Ask yourself what you must accomplish in your first three months, what you want to accomplish in the future, and how you plan to continually improve your efficiency. These are just a few questions to set you off in the right direction. 

Build relationships

Step out of your comfort zone and attempt to interact with everyone you work with. 

Introduce yourself and always accept happy hour invitations. These are the individuals who are likely to be your networking connections for years to come.

Increase your participation

While you might still be nailing down your own duties, it's also important to extend a hand when possible. 

If you know a co-worker could use your help tying up a few loose ends on a project, offer your services. This will provide you with a chance to work with someone new, as well as showcase your willingness and ability to work on a team.

Seek out mentorship

After observing daily operations for a while, reach out to someone you admire within the company. Shoot them an email or stop by their office and share your interest in learning about — and from — their experiences.

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Research your environment

Sometimes you'll be able to get a sneak peek of what to expect. You might be able to find company videos, YouTube channels. or helpful blogs and forums to prepare you for your firs...

Smile and ask questions

You're going to enjoy punching the clock much more if you genuinely like the people around you. 

Get started on the right foot by being friendly. People like people who are curious about them. Like it or not, "making friends" can be just as important as doing your job well.

Practice saying yes

You might feel overwhelmed, but as a newbie always say yes if someone asks you for coffee, to lunch, to volunteer on a project or just about anything else. 

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Arrive Early on the First Day

Reporting to work late on the first day or during the first few weeks can leave the wrong impression. 

To be punctual, you can find out about the reporting time and work tow...

Make a good first impression

The first day in a company is all about making good impressions. And an excellent elevator pitch is one way of endearing yourself to your new workmates. An elevator pitch is a 15–30-second speech that tells your colleague who you are, the roles you have held previously, and what you will be doing in the new job.

Your pitch should never be lengthy. Since you are a stranger in the new workplace, an elevator pitch assists in breaking the ice and striking up conversations as you do your work.

Listen Carefully and Ask Questions

Being a good listener can help you catch on things about the company and your job quickly. 

It is also a good idea to seek clarification by asking various questions. Prepare both general and practical questions concerning the dynamics of your new role. 

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Remote Working

It’s almost hard to imagine now that people would commute 2 hours each way, from home to office and back, hopping buses and trains. Remote working, as discovered by millions recently, has plenty of...

Challenges In Remote Working

Remote working is not without its challenges, with many feeling isolated and unmotivated, being left on their own.

Communication is trickier with colleagues and bosses, and there is a general lack of transparency and chances of overworking.

Tools Of A Good Remote Worker
  • Being Tech Savvy: A Good PC/Laptop, the latest tools and software for the job, and a reliable internet connection are a must for most remote working profiles.
  • Good Communication Skills: Most of the communication will be written, and one should be able to articulate complex concepts and subtleties while being concise. This link provides a handy guide.

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Approaching Burnout At Work
Approaching Burnout At Work

Feeling and identifying the signs of job burnout is a powerful way to arm yourself with the strategies and resources needed to prevent it from bringing you down. So if it’s time to...

Routines Against Burnout

Strong morning and nighttime routines increase your productivity levels, ability to focus, and improve your overall mental and physical health. Your routines can include a healthy meal, exercise, reading, meditation, enjoying time with your family and friends.

However you build your routines, they should be full of activities that bring you joy and fulfillment. Self-care is essential to dealing with job burnout.

Burnout Is An Emotional Exhaustion

It’s a syndrome that results from an extreme accumulation of improperly managed workplace stress that can lead to physical, mental, and social consequences.

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You Dread Going to Work

While it’s normal to have qualms about the work day, if you truly, deeply dread those eight hours at the office, it is time to move on.

You’re Procrastinating
And  you do it more than your actual job. If there’s nothing you find engaging about your day-to-day work, you should consider if your current position is really a good fit for you.
It’s Taking a Toll on Your Health
  • Are your sick days adding up, out of the blue? 
  • Are you taking as much time off as you can possibly get?
  • Are you resorting to a few (or many) glasses of wine each night to get over a bad day at work? 
  • Are you working so many hours you have no time to exercise, eat healthily or get enough sleep? 

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Take A Break

When you’re working on a big project, taking a real break is important for mental productivity. 

Stop the project you’re working on, take some real time away, and come back to it with a ...

Mind Map It

A common reason for feeling stuck on a project is because there’s too much information to process, causing you to lose clarity on your end goal.

Mind mapping is a visual note-taking style to help you get your ideas out on paper. Essentially, you’re making a map of how all of your ideas relate to one another. Start with one central idea, like the overall project goal or just a piece of it. From there, think about the major tasks, goals, or ideas behind the projects.

Try A Change Of Scenery

Getting out of the space you associate with your project can help bring an unexpected shift in your perspective.

Try to get away from the setting you’ve been working in. Do you work from home? Try a new location like a coffee shop, library, or coworking space. Work in an office? Go offsite with your team.

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Put a Deadline on Your Thoughts

To avoid over-ruminating about a decision, give yourself a time frame to think about it. 

If it’s a small issue such as what paint color to paint your office, perhaps...

Schedule Your Thinking Time

To avoid thinking about problems all day long, schedule a specific time where you give yourself the freedom to think about the issue you need to make a decision about. 

If thoughts about the issue creep into your brain before your scheduled thinking time, tell yourself “No, I’m going to think about that after dinner, not during this meeting”.

Problem Solving vs. Worrying

Dwelling on a problem, thinking “this is horrible, I can’t handle this” or rehashing things that happened in the past are an unproductive use of your time.

Thinking about what steps you can take to improve the situation or actively thinking of a solution to the problem are helpful toward moving forward. 

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Avoiding office politics
“Avoiding (office) politics altogether can be deadly for your career. Every workplace has an intricate system of power, and you can—and should—work it ethically to your best advantage.” --...
Social Astuteness

Aim to become something of a “corporate anthropologist,” observing the relationships between co-workers and superiors and paying attention to informal social networks.

By observing the communication and relationships that surround you at work, you might discover that instead of hiding when the team gets competitive, you would do better to hang in there, go toe-to-toe with them, and ultimately earn their respect.

Interpersonal Influence

Look for people who are not necessarily in high-level roles, but who have the ability to make things happen. Who are the movers and shakers in your organization, and what can you learn from how they get things done?

For example, you might discover that before voicing an opposing opinion in a global teleconference, it pays to have influential backers present. 

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