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8 Tips for a Smooth Transition into a New Job

Increase your participation

While you might still be nailing down your own duties, it's also important to extend a hand when possible. 

If you know a co-worker could use your help tying up a few loose ends on a project, offer your services. This will provide you with a chance to work with someone new, as well as showcase your willingness and ability to work on a team.

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Arrive Early on the First Day

Reporting to work late on the first day or during the first few weeks can leave the wrong impression. 

To be punctual, you can find out about the reporting time and work towards getting to the workplace at least 15 minutes earlier. Take into account factors such as ongoing construction, traffic, and other hiccups that might delay you from getting to work on time.

Make a good first impression

The first day in a company is all about making good impressions. And an excellent elevator pitch is one way of endearing yourself to your new workmates. An elevator pitch is a 15–30-second speech that tells your colleague who you are, the roles you have held previously, and what you will be doing in the new job.

Your pitch should never be lengthy. Since you are a stranger in the new workplace, an elevator pitch assists in breaking the ice and striking up conversations as you do your work.

Listen Carefully and Ask Questions

Being a good listener can help you catch on things about the company and your job quickly. 

It is also a good idea to seek clarification by asking various questions. Prepare both general and practical questions concerning the dynamics of your new role. 

Remote Working

It’s almost hard to imagine now that people would commute 2 hours each way, from home to office and back, hopping buses and trains. Remote working, as discovered by millions recently, has plenty of freedom and the added advantage of no-commute.

Landing oneself in a remote working job isn’t a cakewalk, and aspirants need a plan that will showcase them as the best candidate, who is cut out for working productively without supervision.

Challenges In Remote Working

Remote working is not without its challenges, with many feeling isolated and unmotivated, being left on their own.

Communication is trickier with colleagues and bosses, and there is a general lack of transparency and chances of overworking.

Tools Of A Good Remote Worker
  • Being Tech Savvy: A Good PC/Laptop, the latest tools and software for the job, and a reliable internet connection are a must for most remote working profiles.
  • Good Communication Skills: Most of the communication will be written, and one should be able to articulate complex concepts and subtleties while being concise. This link provides a handy guide.
Avoiding office politics
“Avoiding (office) politics altogether can be deadly for your career. Every workplace has an intricate system of power, and you can—and should—work it ethically to your best advantage.” -- Erin Burt

Those that are politically savvy have better career prospects, better career trajectories, and are seen to be more promotable.

Social Astuteness

Aim to become something of a “corporate anthropologist,” observing the relationships between co-workers and superiors and paying attention to informal social networks.

By observing the communication and relationships that surround you at work, you might discover that instead of hiding when the team gets competitive, you would do better to hang in there, go toe-to-toe with them, and ultimately earn their respect.

Interpersonal Influence

Look for people who are not necessarily in high-level roles, but who have the ability to make things happen. Who are the movers and shakers in your organization, and what can you learn from how they get things done?

For example, you might discover that before voicing an opposing opinion in a global teleconference, it pays to have influential backers present.