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The tiny breaks that ease your body and reboot your brain

Why stretching matters

Tiny breaks are thought to help us to cope with long periods at our desks by taking the strain off certain body structures – such as the neck – that we’re using all day.

If you’re getting into microbreaks to give your body – rather than your brain – a rest, it’s best to do something physical like standing up or changing position.  

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The tiny breaks that ease your body and reboot your brain

The tiny breaks that ease your body and reboot your brain

https://www.bbc.com/worklife/article/20190312-the-tiny-breaks-that-ease-your-body-and-reboot-your-brain

bbc.com

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Key Ideas

Microbreaks

They refer to any brief activity that helps to break up the monotony of physically or mentally draining tasks. 

They can last anywhere from a few seconds to several minutes and involve anything from making a cup of tea to stretching or watching a music video.

The power of microbreaks

They can improve workers’ ability to concentrate, change the way they see their jobs, and even help them avoid the typical injuries that people get when they’re tied to their desks all day.

There’s no consensus on how long the ideal microbreak should last or how often you should have them; it’s up to you to experiment with what works best.

Disengaging from work

Microbreaks give workers the license to indulge in what can look suspiciously like time-wasting. 

They enable “psychological detachment”, which occurs when you mentally disengage from work-based tasks and allow your brain to recover: actively shifting the focus of your thoughts, so that you’re not mulling over work while you’re trying to chill out.

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