"Needing" therapy - Deepstash

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Does Everyone Need Therapy? | Nick Wignall

"Needing" therapy

By framing therapy in terms of what we need rather than what we could benefit from, many people experience too much shame or embarrassment to try it.

Not everybody needs therapy. But just because you don’t need something doesn’t mean you couldn’t benefit from it.

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