A Colleague Is Rude to You

A Colleague Is Rude to You

At some point in your career, someone won’t be nice to you in the office, and it can really leave you feeling uncertain.

If your colleague said something rude one time, it was probably just an off statement. If, however, you notice the trend continuing and that person seems to be singling you out, it’s time to take action. 

Ask the offending co-worker for a quick walk or coffee meeting to mention your concerns.

166 STASHED

1 LIKE

3 Situations You're Probably Overanalyzing (and How to Stop)

themuse.com

MORE IDEAS FROM THE ARTICLE

You Think You’re Going to Be Fired

... or Promoted

Your boss mentioned the word "fired" and looked in your direction? A colleague whispered that someone in your department was getting promoted? 

The easiest way to handle this situation is to keep doing whatever it is you’re doing. If you’re supposed to go somewhere else, someone will tell you.

101 STASHED

You Had an Email Mishap

Whether your important client memo included a typo or you sent a message to the totally wrong person, one of the most common things to overanalyze is email. 

To avoid future email issues, go to the “Labs” tab of your Gmail settings and enable the “Undo Send” option. If you think your email contained a serious issue, it’s always better to confront it head-on in a quick follow-up email rather than waiting it out.

104 STASHED

Deepstash helps you become inspired, wiser and productive, through bite-sized ideas from the best articles, books and videos out there.

GET THE APP:

RELATED IDEAS

Cal Newport on better managing time
  • To-Do lists are useless. Schedule everything.
  • Assume you’re going home at 5:30, then plan your day backwards.
  • Make a plan for the entire week
  • Do very few things, but be awesome at them.
  • Less shallow work, focus on the deep stuff.

6.33K STASHED

143 LIKES

How To Stop Being Lazy And Get More Done

bakadesuyo.com

Our brains are programmed to procrastinate
It’s easier for our brains to process concrete and immediate outcomes rather than abstract and future things. So the short-term effort easily dominates the long-term upside in our minds— behavioral scientists call this present bias.

295 STASHED

How to Beat Procrastination

hbr.org

Most decision-making errors boil down to:

  • logical fallacies (over-generalizations, comparing apples and oranges, circular thinking)
  • limiting beliefs (underestimations of what's possible)
  • judgment biases (valuing certain factors above others).

1.5K STASHED

2 LIKES

4 Common Decision-Making Mistakes That Are Holding You Back

bustle.com