Metaphors and imagery

Metaphors and imagery

If you can get an audience to really 'see' what you’re trying to explain, they will not only be able to understand it better, but they will also remember it.

Analogies and metaphors work really well, especially if there are no real-life examples to draw on.

@reeser291

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Communication

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What you say, and how you say it

When trying to explain complex information to an audience, the first task is to get the content of what you're saying right. 

How we communicate is also crucial. When someone is speaking, most of the information we receive comes through their body language, enthusiasm and tone of voice. It's our overall experience of the speaker that counts.

Try not to use technical language. If you do, make sure it is absolutely necessary in order to help the audience understand or appreciate your point – and ensure that you explain the word or term immediately afterwards.

Keep your words as simple and clear as possible, and use real-life examples and illustrations where possible. But don’t patronize your audience.

How to use body language

If you look alert but relaxed, your audience will mirror this and feel the same way. Stand up straight, but relax any tension or stiffness in your body. 

It’s a good idea to gesture with your hands in such a way that helps to make clear what you are explaining – but only do this if it feels natural, and try not to wave your arms around unnecessarily.

It is important to celebrate your own uniqueness and use your own way of communicating. Think about how you would tell your friends an exciting thing that happened to you today, and what gestures you would naturally use.

Pacing or moving around as you talk can sometimes add to the excitement of the story, but it can also be distracting. 

It is a good idea to video yourself to see if there are any things you are doing that are distracting or give away your nerves. Fidgeting, fiddling, shifting your weight, swaying or playing with a pen are classic examples of this.

One of the most important areas of body language is eye contact. This can really help an audience feel immersed in the story, but can also help you, as a presenter, to feel less nervous. 

A few seconds of eye contact with individual audience members will actually help to calm your nerves. 

Think of your talk as a series of self-contained mini-talks, then if one part goes wrong, gets forgotten, or simply doesn’t feel like it’s working on the day, just jump to the next part – you can always go back to it later.

Nerves are a perfectly normal phenomenon and are a very useful way of making sure that you are fully energized, revved up, and ready to deliver your talk. 

Embrace the adrenaline rush and try to think of it as excitement rather than fear.

It can be helpful to do some physical exercise a little while before giving a talk. This wakes up your body, releases tension, and gets the creative juices flowing. 

You can also listen to music that inspires or excites you. And then, just before you're ready to go on stage, try to do some breathing exercises or meditation to calm your heart rate and help you focus.

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Use Details They Already Know

Find related information people already know and expand on that. For example, understanding what a blog is can be described as "it's a magazine, but online."  That's incredibly simplistic, but it gets the point across. 

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Infographics

Information graphics or data visualization (infographics) are graphic visual representations of information, data or knowledge intended to present information quickly and clearly to a live or online audience.

Infographics are making a big impact in communicating about complex topics, making information eye-catching, shareable and easily digestible. 

To have a better chance of making complex information memorable, ask yourself these 2 questions:

  • If my audience will only remember one thing about my explanation, what is that "one thing?"
  • And, why should my audience care about this "one thing?"

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