Being concerned - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

deepstash

Beta

Five Things You Notice When You Quit the News

Being concerned

Watching the news makes us feel like we’re doing something when we’re not.

We feel bad ignoring the bad stuff that happens in the world. So we keep watching:  Because watching disasters unfold, even while we do nothing, at least feels a little more compassionate than switching off.

148 SAVES


EXPLORE MORE AROUND THESE TOPICS:

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Cognitive biases
Cognitive biases

...are common thinking errors that harm our rational decision-making.

We don't always see things as they are. We don't simply glean information through the senses and act on it; inste...

Optimism Bias

Is our tendency to overestimate the odds of our own success compared to other people's. 

Overly optimistic predictions can be dangerous, leading us to waste time and resources pursuing unrealistic goals. In the real world of business, things don't always work out for the best, and it serves us well to know when conditions are not on our side.

How to control the optimism bias
  • Be skeptical of your own rosy expectations for your work. 
  • Assume projects will be more difficult and more expensive than you initially think they will. 
  • Don't trust your good ideas to manifest through positive thinking - be ready to fight for them.
  • Trust the numbers. Numbers are firm but fair, and getting intimate with your business's cash flow can help you make more rational decisions.
Informing ourselves

Most people think that we have a responsibility to remain informed, but keeping up with the news can make us feel increasingly anxious, angry and demoralized.

The constant flood of inform...

Find the right dose

According to psychiatrist M.Katherine Shear, many people feel bogged down by the news. 22% of subjects in a 2015 study experienced symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder after viewing violent images on social media.

We need to view the news, but then also learn to set it aside. Try to find your own dose with emotionally charged news.

Read past the headlines

People regularly share stories based only on headlines. Five or six words are not enough to tell the entire story.

Researchers found that 59 % of shared news links had never been clicked through and read. When you do share a link, try and share a piece of the content from the article, so people understand why you are reacting to it.