deepstash

Beta

How to Scale Yourself and Get More Done Than You Thought Possible

Effectiveness Vs Efficiency

  • Effectiveness is goal orientation. It's picking something to do. This is doing the right things—picking a goal and doing that goal.
  • Efficiency is doing things in an economical way, process-oriented.

451 SAVES


This is a professional note extracted from an online article.

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

How to Scale Yourself and Get More Done Than You Thought Possible

How to Scale Yourself and Get More Done Than You Thought Possible

https://zapier.com/blog/scale-yourself-scott-hanselman/

zapier.com

9

Key Ideas

Effectiveness Vs Efficiency

  • Effectiveness is goal orientation. It's picking something to do. This is doing the right things—picking a goal and doing that goal.
  • Efficiency is doing things in an economical way, process-oriented.

Scott Hanselman

Scott Hanselman

"Effectiveness is doing the right things, but efficiency is doing things right. That means effectiveness is picking a direction and efficiency is running really fast in that direction."

Scott Hanselman

Scott Hanselman

"Hope is not a plan. Hope is nothing but waiting and letting life happen to you."

Define "Work"

David Allen's threefold nature of work:

  • Pre-defined work: Work you've set up ahead of time.
  • Work as it appears: Work that interrupts you.
  • Defining work: You sit down and think about what work you need to be doing.

The Four Ds

  • Do It
  • Drop it
  • Delegate it
  • Defer it

Only do it if it's going to take a minute and it's been scheduled. Otherwise, just drop it, delegate it and defer it.

Resolve Inbox Issues

  • Change the way emails appear in your inbox: set up a folder for emails that you're Cc'd on and a folder for emails that come directly to you.
  • Don't reply to emails in the morning (or at night): it teaches people that they should expect future replies from you at that time. 
  • Keep your emails to 3-4 sentences.

Remain in Your Flow

If anything important happens in the world, it will come your way many times. 

There's no need to hit refresh every 5 minutes on news sites. Somebody will tell you. 

Multitasking is a Myth

When you're multitasking you are actually doing something called task-switching, which requires context switching. And this harms your productivity overall.

"If it's not helping me to make money, if it's not improving my life in some way, it's mental clutter and it's out."

"If it's not helping me to make money, if it's not improving my life in some way, it's mental clutter and it's out."

EXPLORE MORE AROUND THESE TOPICS:

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Zen to Done (ZTD)

It's a productivity system that teaches how to take a simple approach to improving your productivity, by encouraging you to focus on forming one productivity-boosting habit at a time. 

The Minimalist Habits of Zen to Done
  • Collect: Get ideas and to-dos out of your brain and onto a list.
  • Process: Review your list daily and decide how to act on each item.
  • Plan: Pick a few high priority items to accomplish each week and every day.
  • Do: Schedule time to accomplish your selected to-dos without interruptions.
The Collect Habit

To clear your mind and improve focus, get your ideas and to-dos out of your mind and onto a list. 

Documenting to-dos in the moment lessens the likelihood that you'll forget to do something and gives you a master list of to-dos to reference when you're trying to decide where to direct your time.

2 more ideas

Cal Newport on better managing time
  • To-Do lists are useless. Schedule everything.
  • Assume you’re going home at 5:30, then plan your day backwards.
  • ...
There are no productivity hacks
There are no productivity hacks

Habits and work systems can produce the best return on your time.

Getting more work done is about knowing what to do, when to do it, and how to get it done in order to maxi...

Unimportant tasks are really just distractions

Urgent but unimportant tasks = distractions.

Urgent tasks put us into constant “reply mode.” Important work is related to planned tasks that move us closer to our goals.

Interruptions break your flow

Anytime you are pulled away from your tasks, it takes time to readjust to them when you jump back in (sometimes it can take up to 25 minutes).

Interruptions (notifications, loud noises, social media, checking email etc.) harm your concentration.

2 more ideas