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Take Control of Your Learning at Work

Knowledge and expertise

In this digital age, knowledge and expertise have been devalued.

What you know is now less relevant than what you can learn, and employers are less interested in hiring people with particular expertise than with the general ability to develop the right expertise in the future.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

Take Control of Your Learning at Work

Take Control of Your Learning at Work

https://hbr.org/2018/07/take-control-of-your-learning-at-work

hbr.org

8

Key Ideas

Motivation to learn

We have an impressive ability to learn, but our motivation to do so tends to decrease with age:

  • As children, we are naturally curious and free to explore the world around us. 
  • As adults, we are much more interested in preserving what we have learned, to the point of resisting any information that challenges our views and opinions.

Knowledge and expertise

In this digital age, knowledge and expertise have been devalued.

What you know is now less relevant than what you can learn, and employers are less interested in hiring people with particular expertise than with the general ability to develop the right expertise in the future.

Access to information

When we can all retrieve the same information, the key differentiator is not access to data, but the ability to make use of it, the capacity to translate the available information into useful knowledge.

Pick the right organization

Be sure to have 'learning potential' as a key element when choosing a job.

Your learning potential is partly dependent on your own personality, but your propensity to learn will be strongly influenced by the type of job, career, and organization you pick.

To create a learning culture

... organizations must value psychological safety, diversity, openness to ideas, and reflection time, all of which can hinder short-term results.

Set aside time for learning

It's essential that you own your own learning process, managing your professional growth and development.

If you are waiting to be told what to learn, you are not being proactive about your learning.

Ignore your strengths

We can only develop new strengths by addressing our weaknesses, so if you want to acquire skills you don’t have, or develop new expertise, you will inevitably have to focus on what you don’t know rather than what you do know. 

Learn from others

From peers, colleagues, bosses, and especially mentors. Some of the biggest learning opportunities are organic or spontaneous.

However, this requires seeking the right feedback and being receptive to others’ suggestions, including criticism. 

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Understand Your Performance Evaluation

Find out if your performance evaluation is according to what you understand. Identify your goals and key performance indicators with your manager, and discuss accordingly.

Solve your Blind Spots

Ask for feedback, learn from it and adjust your performance (or behavior) according to the areas of improvement that you get to know from others.

Example: After giving a presentation, talk about what went well and ask if there is something that you could have done better.

Keep a Journal

Keeping a journal with a record of your learnings and feedback (areas of improvement) can keep us on the right path, and speed up our progress, and learning too.

Listing out 5 or 10 areas of improvement and tracking the progress in weekly or monthly reviews is a great way to develop your career.

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Learners are made, not born
Through the deliberate use of practice and dedicated strategies to improve our ability to learn. But many people mistakenly believe that the ability to learn is a matter of intelligence, an immutable ...
Effective learning=organizing your goals
Effective learning boils down to a type of project management. In order to develop an area of expertise, we first have to set achievable goals about what we want to learn. Then we have to develop strategies to help us reach those goals.
Thinking about thinking

Metacognition (thinking about thinking) is about being more inspective about how you know what you know. It's a matter of asking ourselves questions like: Do I really get this idea? Could I explain it to a friend? What are my goals? Do I need more background knowledge? Or do I need more practice?

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Fewer decision-making errors

Curiosity leads us to generate alternatives.

When our curiosity is triggered, we are less likely to fall prey to confirmation bias (looking for information that supports our bel...

More innovation

Encouraging people to be curious generates workplace improvements

When we are curious, we view tough situations more creatively. Studies have found that curiosity is associated with less defensive reactions to stress and less aggressive reactions to provocation. 

Reduced group conflict

Curiosity encourages members of a group to put themselves in one another’s shoes and take an interest in one another’s ideas rather than focus only on their own perspective. Thus, conflicts are less heated, and groups achieve better results.

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