Fear of Feeling Stuck - Deepstash

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5 Ways to Overcome Your Most Common Fears About Work

Fear of Feeling Stuck

Fear of Feeling Stuck

You are able to rise above this fear. We all want to feel that we can be promoted and rewarded in a company.

Ask yourself: What does my boss’s boss want and need? How can I contribute with my skills, expertise and results?

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Negative Feedback
Negative feedback is a more important component of the feedback cycle than positive feedback. 92% of people say in a study that negative feedback improves workplace performance.
Why are people scared of Feedback

Normally people react with caution and fear towards negative feedback, but it is much better than no feedback at all.

Informing the colleague/subordinate/client/customer or individual about something that is not working, is always beneficial, and builds transparency and trust.

Check how it impacts the person

The fundamental goal of giving feedback is to help the person you’re giving it to. They should realize that you are not trying to make them feel bad, and this is an exercise to help make them better.

How it impacts each individual is going to be different so a tailor-made approach is required. 

One of the most common difficulties with getting to sleep is people just can’t turn their minds off. According to the American Psychological Association, 43 percent of Americans say stress has caus...

Encourage positive distractions

Focusing all your attention on how you can’t get to sleep will only make sleep more difficult. Instead, distract yourself with engaging imagery, involving as many as your senses as possible.

For example, close your eyes and picture a nice beach—can you hear the crashing of waves? Feel the sun on your skin? Taste the salt from the sea?

Allow worrisome thoughts

If you’re unable to sleep because you’re fixated on something stressful that’s happening the next day, it’s common to want to push those thoughts from your mind. However, doing so may hurt more than it helps.

Remembering the mundane tasks that follow something stressful, can help you recognize that the panic will pass.

Failing to ask for clarification

Not asking for clarification because of fear of looking incompetent in front of authority.

FIX: If you don't understand what success looks like, ask for clarification, specifics or...

Not framing your remarks

In general, the higher up the audience, the less detail you should be providing. Frequently, executives get tuned out when they report to higher levels and provide too much detail about their topic.

FIX: Cater your comments to the highest level person in the room, and address what he or she will find valuable. Put the details in an appendix or have them ready so they're available, and you can easily pull them out if asked.

Littering your speech with qualifiers

Using qualifiers such as "I think" or "we might" or "I hope to" before your points. It lacks confidence.

FIX: Start paying attention to how you use language, and if you're hiding behind qualifiers. Tape yourself or ask a colleague to take note of when you use them, and find a comfortable phrase to replace them such as "I plan to" or "I will."