Constraints and productivity - Deepstash

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What's More Productive: Counting Hours or Tasks Accomplished?

Constraints and productivity

If you make work a scarcer quantity, you’re more likely to use time wisely and get things done than if it feels like an endless to-do list.

And you cand do this by restricting your hours or restricting your workload.

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Mastering ‘internal triggers'

To master time, master your ‘internal triggers.’

Try to understand the uncomfortable sensations you're trying to escape when you reach for your cell phone or email account, then learn ...

Tracking input

Many people use to-do lists without considering the amount of time it takes to complete a task

Practice  "timeboxing" your schedule: assigning a maximum amount of time for an activity. It can help give context and limits to ambiguous tasks.

Remove external triggers

A simple way to accomplish this is to manage the notification settings on your smartphone. 

Try turning off personal email notifications. Unless social media is part of your job, consider turning off notifications from apps like Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter during work hours. Designate a specific time during your day to check personal communications.

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“When you focus on the practice instead of the performance, you can enjoy the present moment and improve at the same time.”
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  • Capture. Write down everything you need to do.
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If a task takes less than 2 minutes, then do it now.

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