Deal With Conflict Directly - Deepstash

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6 Tips For Managing People Who Are Hard To Manage

Deal With Conflict Directly

The best managers don’t avoid or bulldoze over conflicts, as doing so is harmful to cooperation. They understand people will have to keep working together in the future and that constructive and fair solutions are the ideal.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Robert Kiyosaki

“A person can be highly educated, professionally successful, and financially illiterate.”

Robert Kiyosaki
Financial Literacy Questions

A financially literate person should be able to answer these questions:

  • How much are they earning after tax and after saving for retirement? Is it fair considering their education level and job title?
  • Are they earning above sector median rates, below, or on par?
  • How much goes to their retirement accounts?
  • How much goes into their investments?
  • What are the rates of return on their investments when benchmarked against an index like the S&P 500?
  • What are their financial plans?
  • Can they read a company's financial statement?
  • Do they understand their tax benefits?
  • Do they understand their retirement requirements?
  • Do they have a plan for retiring?
The Pressure Of Time

Most leaders have familiar approaches to managing time: setting goals, planning, delegating, tracking commitments, and creating to-do lists. While these approaches do help in self-organization, they are not adequate in helping achieve high levels of sustainable, long-term performance.

The challenge is to have a fast-paced occupation while avoiding burnout, slippage, and sub-optimal performance.

Sustainable Productivity

Instead of increasing the number of productive hours, we can focus on getting the right things done in a timely way. We also need to restore and balance ourselves, our colleagues, family and environment, instead of a neurotic or pathological focus on deadlines.

Find out what's truly important to us and use the finite resource of time wisely.

Phantom Workload

Phantom workload looks like real work but results in massive unproductivity and even conflict in an organization. The pressure to meet unrealistic expectations causes a vicious cycle of further workload.

Leaders need to take a hard look at what is being avoided or not addressed. Facing difficult tasks that were 'swept under the carpet' earlier strengthens them further to make hard decisions and face difficult people and situations.

Communication during stressful times
Communication during stressful times

Uncertainty has a way to reveal everyone's strengths and weaknesses. During drastic uncertainty, employees will seek more information in order to achieve a sense of certainty. During this unstable time, you'll discover the true quality of your team's communication skills. If you team is arguing, productivity is lagging.

Discovering each member's communication preferences will enable you to determine the best way forward.

Managing the passive communicators
  • Talk to them one-on-one. They will feel more comfortable opening up.
  • Offer multiple modes of communication. Instead of calling on them during a meeting, send them an email afterward.
  • Help them feel psychologically safe at work. Let your team know they won't face negative consequences for voicing their opinion respectfully.

Passive communicators battle to express their needs and stand by their convictions. This is because they want to avoid conflict. They may be silent during crucial meetings. If they do make a suggestion and it is challenged, they may say, "never mind then."

Managing the aggressive communicators
  • Outline and enforce boundaries. If they interrupt someone, step in and say, "Please let [Name} finish, and afterward, we'll give you time to speak too."
  • Give them a safe and healthy way to vent their anger. People under pressure are more likely to act out. Pull them aside for a one-on-one time to address their concerns.

Aggressive Communicators voice their opinions in a straightforward, often blunt way. They often interrupt others, take up significantly more time than others during meetings and don't take into account others' feelings or opinions.