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How to Be Mindful in Love - Mindful

Really see each other

Making eye contact with someone can relieve stress and create a deeper sense of connection. 

Even making eye contact with a stranger can soften your heart.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

How to Be Mindful in Love - Mindful

How to Be Mindful in Love - Mindful

https://www.mindful.org/how-to-be-mindful-in-love/

mindful.org

10

Key Ideas

Really see each other

Making eye contact with someone can relieve stress and create a deeper sense of connection. 

Even making eye contact with a stranger can soften your heart.

Listen with all of your senses

When you talk with someone in person, notice the posture and body language of the other person. Focus on the tone in their voice. Consider the meaning of their words.

Reach out and touch someone

Touch is a way we communicate and essential to our development. Touch makes us feel safe and encourage trust, love, and compassion.

Reach out to your loved ones and see if you notice a difference.

Be interested

We often fall into a habit of thinking we know someone so well that we can predict their behaviors and responses.

Instead, be open and interested in those close to you as if you just met them.

Make plans and keep them

Nothing breaks bonds like postponing or canceling commitments. 

Be honest with yourself and make or accept appointments you can commit to. Your relationships will flourish when you take the time to know others better.

Communicate your needs

Most of us have been vague about what we really need in the moment.

When you learn how to identify and express your needs clearly, you will be better understood and connect with the people in your life.

Be kind

People are drawn to kind people because they feel cared about and safe with them.

When we practice kindness towards others, we help to build positive connections.

Think first

We should make an effort to be thoughtful with our words and actions. Before speaking to someone, consider:

  • Is it True
  • Is it Helpful 
  • Am I the best person to say it
  • Is it Necessary 
  • Is it Kind

Practice “Just like me”

Humans are 99.9% the same. We all want to feel cared for, be understood and belong somewhere. 

When you see someone you think is different from you, say, "Just like me." It may foster a better sense of connection in your life.

Experience joy for others

Make a point to notice others taking care of themselves, experiencing success, or having a good day. Be happy for them. You can even tell them, "Good job" or "I am so happy for you." It can boost your own good feelings.

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