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Why Silence Is So Good For Your Brain

The brain’s default mode network

Engaging this network helps us to make meaning out of our experiences, empathize with others, be more creative and reflect on our own mental and emotional states. 

In order to do this, it’s necessary to break away from the distractions.

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Why Silence Is So Good For Your Brain

Why Silence Is So Good For Your Brain

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/silence-brain-benefits_n_56d83967e4b0000de4037004

huffpost.com

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Key Ideas

Seeking silence

As our internal and external environments become louder and louder, more people are beginning to seek out silence, whether through a practice of sitting quietly for 10 minutes every morning or heading off to a 10-day silent retreat.

Silence relieves tension

Noise pollution may lead to high blood pressure and heart attacks, as well as impairing hearing and overall health. Loud noises raise stress levels by activating the brain’s amygdala and causing the release of the stress hormone cortisol, according to research.

Silence has the opposite effect, releasing tension in the brain and body.

Silence and our mental resources

The constant attentional demands of modern life put a significant burden on the prefrontal cortex of the brain, which is involved in high-order thinking, decision-making and problem-solving.

When we can finally get away from these sonic disruptions, our brains’ attention centers have the opportunity to restore themselves.

The brain’s default mode network

Engaging this network helps us to make meaning out of our experiences, empathize with others, be more creative and reflect on our own mental and emotional states. 

In order to do this, it’s necessary to break away from the distractions.

Regenerating brain cells

Silence can quite literally grow the brain.

Research found that two hours of silence daily led to the development of new cells in the hippocampus, a key brain region associated with learning, memory and emotion.

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Rising Noise Around Us
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Effect Of Noise on Children
  • According to the United Nations, about two-thirds of the world's population will be living in cities by the next 30 years.
  • The World Health Organization recommends classrooms to be not louder than 35 decibels, which is never the case in big cities.
  • Children are facing disruption in their learning, and research points out that those who study in a noisy place are 11 months behind the ones who are studying in quieter places in the same vicinity.
Living In Noise

Most of the city planning is done so that the affluent neighborhoods are in quieter areas.

However, this is also nullified when the ultra-rich who travel frequently stay close to the transit hubs (like Airports), being exposed to high decibels of noise.

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2 types of everyday "bad noise"
  • Excessive noise: the prolonged loud noise.
  • The distraction of general noise around us: conversations or interruptions from colleagues in the workplace.
Noise is bad for health

It increases blood pressure, increases stress, disturbs our sleep. 

And more importantly, it is linked to our bad mental health. It's why we don't have schools in the vicinity of airports anymore.  

"In most workplaces, focused work is left to chance.If nobody's called you for a meeting that day, you might get an afternoon to yourself."

- Ollie Campbell, CEO of Milanote

"In most workplaces, focused work is left to chance.If nobody's called you for a meeting that day, you might get an afternoon to yourself."

- Ollie Campbell, CEO of Milanote

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Noise Pollution

Many studies link noise pollution to:

  • High blood pressure
  • Sleep loss
  • Heart disease

Just as noise pollution is bad for you, silence can actually benefit you...

New Brain Cells

Giving us another reason to meditate, a study proves that a silent environment helps create new brain cells.

Activation of Memory

Silence helps activate our brain to work better and jog its memory banks efficiently.

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