Stop feeling like a fraud - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

deepstash

Beta

How to Banish Imposter Syndrome and Embrace Everything You Deserve

Stop feeling like a fraud

  • Once you’ve identified the confidence culprit, tell someone. Choose someone who sees you outside of that environment
  • Remind yourself of all of your achievements
  • Remind yourself that the people who got you here are incredibly competent and they did not make a mistake
  • Update your language with more confident, assertive phrases
  • Reframe your story by writing it down
  • Try mentoring

84 SAVES


This is a professional note extracted from an online article.

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

How to Banish Imposter Syndrome and Embrace Everything You Deserve

How to Banish Imposter Syndrome and Embrace Everything You Deserve

https://www.themuse.com/advice/how-to-banish-imposter-syndrome-and-embrace-everything-you-deserve

themuse.com

2

Key Ideas

Imposter syndrome

It occurs when we feel that we don't deserve our successes and the rewards that come along with them.

We believe they’re caused by luck, timing, or other factors outside of our control, instead of embracing the fact that we’re actually responsible for having made them happen.

EXPLORE MORE AROUND THESE TOPICS:

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

The Impostor Syndrome And Our Expectations
The Impostor Syndrome And Our Expectations

The new generation has experienced a never-ending stream of expectations, where their achievements are never enough. They are always pushed up on the edge of perfection, being rated and scored ever...

Young Achievers With Impostor Syndrome
  • Most of the young achievers having impostor syndrome feel like a fraud and are constantly judging themselves as not being up-to-the-mark in their endeavours.
  • Their parents may have empathized on achievements too much, and engaged in praising or criticizing them during their formative years.
  • They might attribute their achievements to pure luck, but blame themselves for their failures.
Five Ways To Handle Impostor Syndrome
  1. Instead of a constant judgement of your thoughts, we must find acceptance and get curious over the feelings, dumping the negativity around them.
  2. Delving a bit into our own childhood, we can try to be compassionate towards ourselves, gently handling our emotions and worries.
  3. Realize that the feeling of impostor syndrome is just a byproduct of being out of your comfort zone, and into the learning zone.
  4. Make use of the impostor syndrome to work hard and push yourself to improvise, for yourself.
  5. Engage with such feelings in a healthy, objective way and understand that your achievements are a sign of your intelligence.
Impostor Syndrome

Is a psychological phenomenon that reflects the core belief that you are an inadequate, incompetent, and a failure, despite evidence that indicates you're skilled and successful.

Impos...

Causes of the Impostor Syndrome

From a psychological standpoint, it may be influenced by certain factors early in life, particularly the development of certain beliefs and attitude towards success and one's self-worth.

Signs You Have Impostor Syndrome
  • You don't think you deserve success.
  • You think you're a fake and you're going to be found out.
  • You attribute your success to luck.
  • You think you're not special, anyone can do what you do.
  • You can't internalize your success so you credit others for it.
  • You can't accept praise.
  • Failure is not an option.
  • You use "I'm pretty sure" or "I kind of think" because of lack of confidence.
  • You discredit your achievements.
Impostor Syndrome

It is a psychological phenomenon that reflects the belief that you’re an inadequate and incompetent failure despite evidence that indicates you’re skilled and quite successful.

The Perfectionist

They set the bar excessively high for themselves and when they fail to reach their goals, they experience major self-doubt. For this type, success is rarely satisfying because they believe they could’ve done even better.

But that’s not productive. Learning to celebrate achievements is essential if you want to avoid burnout and find contentment.

The Superwoman/man

Impostor workaholics are actually addicted to the validation that comes from working, not to the work itself. They push themselves to work harder, to measure up with their colleagues.

Start drifting away from external validation. No one should have more power to make you feel good about yourself than you.

3 more ideas