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Don't get fooled or conned again - here are the 5 tactics to look out for

Time pressure and Opportunity

Combining time pressure and opportunity is a potent sales tactic. Think of the Black Friday and Cyber Monday sales (time pressure) that lead us to spend more than we typically would on things (the opportunity).

It is easier to manipulate people when they feel under pressure and don't have the time to consider the facts.

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Don't get fooled or conned again - here are the 5 tactics to look out for

Don't get fooled or conned again - here are the 5 tactics to look out for

https://ideas.ted.com/dont-get-fooled-or-conned-again-here-are-the-5-tactics-to-look-out-for/

ideas.ted.com

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Key Ideas

We get fooled regularly

People and businesses often use techniques to get us to do what they want. We go for the “buy two, get one free” offer at the drugstore, or buy the advertised special, even when it is not really needed.

While other people are responsible for the scams, the persuasion mostly happens in our minds. 

Misdirection

The age-old tactic of misdirection is employed to distract us from the real issue. Companies and governments even implement it: they release bad news on Fridays or before major holidays with the hope that the weekend will distract us from focussing on the issue.  

Time pressure and Opportunity

Combining time pressure and opportunity is a potent sales tactic. Think of the Black Friday and Cyber Monday sales (time pressure) that lead us to spend more than we typically would on things (the opportunity).

It is easier to manipulate people when they feel under pressure and don't have the time to consider the facts.

Social compliance and Social proof

Social compliance refers to how we respond to people in authority or to those who have the appearance of competence and expertise.

Social proof refers to how we look for cues around us to know how to behave. This can be easily used against us by manipulating our environment to get us to behave in a certain way. For instance, a large number of "like"s on Facebook and other platforms will attract more "like"s as people take clues from others.

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Misunderstanding body language

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  • Your end up showing that you feel superior to the rest of the room if you tilt your head backward.

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We are visual creatures, and any movement used in the right way in this direction will spark the attention of your audience. Just try not to abuse this rule.

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