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The Proven Path to Creating Unique and Meaningful Work

The Helsinki Bus Station Theory

The Helsinki Bus Station Theory broadly means that our creativity, life and career paths may seem the same as we begin, but our uniqueness and real creative work starts as we branch out eventually, discovering our niche, and being masters of our work in a unique way.

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The Proven Path to Creating Unique and Meaningful Work

The Proven Path to Creating Unique and Meaningful Work

https://jamesclear.com/stay-on-the-bus

jamesclear.com

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Key Ideas

The Helsinki Bus Station Theory

The Helsinki Bus Station Theory broadly means that our creativity, life and career paths may seem the same as we begin, but our uniqueness and real creative work starts as we branch out eventually, discovering our niche, and being masters of our work in a unique way.

Staying on the Bus

If a person 'stays on the bus', gives his best and goes the mile in his work, in time, he will start to see his work shine.

Mastery requires Consistency

Consistency leads to eventual success, which may not be visible in the start (just as a start of bus journey from the same familiar routes) but as life branches out, things start to take shape.

Re-work and Revise

Re-working, re-visiting, and revision of your learning and your creative piece will make all the difference.

Elite, super successful people revise and rework their way to mastery.

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Set Learning Styles

There’s no research to support learning styles. 

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Rereading Material

How to really learn: Instead of rereading, highlighting, or underlining important information, ask yourself:

  • ‘What is the author trying to say?’ 
  • 'How is this different than other things I’ve read?’ 
  • 'How does this relate to other material I know?’ 
Focusing On One Subject At A Time

When it comes to learning a difficult subject, people often believe you should practice one thing at a time.

How to really learn: Mixing it up, however, is a better approach. In mixed learning, you get a chance to see the core idea below it.

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Excuses Breed More Failure

When you are disappointed, you have two choices on how to respond:  You can find out how you could have done it differently, or you can tell yourself that you were not at fault.

Personal Responsibility Breeds Success

Making excuses allows you to externalize your failures and blame something else. It also demotivates you when you feel the outcomes in your life are out of your control.

Taking up responsibility does the opposite: It leads to introspection where you can analyze what you could have done differently. It will motivate you to work better and harder.

How To Stop Making Excuses

It all comes down to the stories you tell yourself when you feel overwhelmed or fail.

If you work too much and don’t have time for fun, do you tell yourself that people demand too much from you? Or, do you tell yourself you don’t prioritize your own time well enough?

In one story you are in control, and the other you are not. Focus on the story you can control.

Intelligence is not genius

Genius is not about having an extraordinarily high IQ, or even about being smart. It is not about finishing Mensa exercises in record time or mastering fourteen languages at the age of seven.

Geniuses and problem solving

Leonardo da Vinci believed you begin by learning how to restructure the problem by looking at it from many different angles.

In order to creatively solve a problem, the thinker should not use the usual approach that is based on past experience. Geniuses use several different perspectives to solve an existing problem and thereby also identify new ones.

Making your thoughts visible

Galileo revolutionized science by making his idea visible with diagrams, maps, and drawings. Einstein believed that words and numbers as they are spoken did not play a significant role in his thinking process.

Geniuses seem to develop a skill to display information in visual and spatial forms, rather than only mathematical or verbal lines. 

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