Leave Your Phone Behind - Deepstash

Bite‑sized knowledge

to upgrade

your career

Ideas from books, articles & podcasts.

Leave Your Phone Behind

Leave Your Phone Behind

You have to show interest to be interesting, so don't look at your phone, look at the person in front of you and provide your full attention.

1

STASHED IN:

257

MORE IDEAS FROM THE SAME ARTICLE

You don’t have to be smart and charismatic to build connections with people — just make a commitment to do the little things right.

Here are a few steps to be liked, while saying little:

  • Don't look at your phone
  • Remember names
  • Leave a good last impression
  • ...

Remember people's names, it really helps build a bond. Make it a priority to memorize and say their names to them. It's something we all like to hear.

Small talk, like asking about the other person's day, or talking about the weather, comes off as pleasant to many, as it puts them at ease.

Small talk is great if you are talking to a complete stranger too.

Having an ice breaker or a conversation starter can be really helpful. You can ask about some tips or advice that relate to their interests, or careers.

A likable person is a good listener and knows when to keep shut and simply listen with intent and genuineness.

Leave a good last impression by offering to connect the person you are speaking with to someone in your network who you think they may get along with.

Association is important.

Discover and save more ideas by creating a

FREE

Deepstash account.

Develop a

reading habit

, save

time

and create an amazing

knowledge library

.

GET THE APP:

MORE LIKE THIS

Public speaking is often topping the charts as the No. 1 fear in the world.

People feel anxious, sweaty, or have a pounding heart while being on stage in front of an audience.

10

STASHED IN:

298

Marcus Aurelius

“Our actions may be impeded…but there can be no impeding our intentions or dispositions. Because we can accommodate and adapt. The mind adapts and converts to its own purposes the obstacle to our acting."

27

STASHED IN:

1.25K

Used in sports to explain why teams who win championships are often ultimately dethroned, not by other, better teams, but by forces from within the organization itself. The players want more: more money, more TV commercials, more playing time, more media attention, etc. As a result, what was once...

2

STASHED IN:

184