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Life as a Tragedy

Life as a Tragedy
Jordan Peterson’s view of the world around him is complex, and he tries to simplify this with books.
  • We are just a speck in this huge, complex world, inviting us to be humble. 
  • Happiness, he says, is a pointless goal,
  • Only compare yourself with your yesterday, not with others.

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MORE IDEAS FROM THE ARTICLE

Jordan Peterson
You’re not as nice as you think. And you’re not as useless as you think
The Aim of Living
Psychology Professor Jordan Peterson's self-help book 12 Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos provides some out-of-the-box ways of living life, borrowing from the works of Nietzsche, Freud, Jung, and Dostoevsky, which are unconventional sources for this kind of work.
The Dark Side

Humans are essentially full of darkness, and that is now visible in social media with the flood of hatred, abuse, and outrage.

Happiness like Cotton Candy

Happiness is just a side effect of good things happening. It is temporary, fleeting and unpredictable. 

Do not make happiness into a constant desire or purpose.

Act Right
Jordan Peterson believes that everyone is born with an instinct for ethics and meaning. 
Build meaning in your life by being ethical and righteous. Being responsible and taking the right, noble path is the way.

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RELATED IDEAS

Jordan Peterson
Why refuse to specify [the outcome]? Because while you are failing to define success, you are also refusing to define failure, to yourself, so that if and when you fail you won’t notice, and it won’t hurt. But that won’t work! You cannot be fooled so easily. You will instead carry with you a continual sense of disappointment in your own Being and the self-contempt that comes along with that and the increasing hatred for the world that all of that generates.

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IDEAS

Peterson believes fathers and children push each other’s limits to “find out where they are.” He cites the fact that kids in a family with a father do better than single-parent families, not citing “families with a mother.” He also believes that a heterosexual nuclear family is the smallest, viable human unit and that going below that comes at a price.

But he admits that women are parents too and that treating gay families in a post-modernist fashion is gerrymandering questions without facing moral responsibilities. In the end, Peterson ignores the power of parental love, the fact that fathers are predominantly at fault for broken homes and that there is no long-term data set on gay families since their acceptance is a recent phenomenon.

From a purely technical point-of-view, a subtext is good.
From a moral point-of-view, it depends on what that subtext is.