Your “about me” answer

Your interviewer will probably open with some form of "Tell me a little about yourself.Plan your answer using a few quick bullet points to keep things brief en then commit it loosely to memory.

  • Skip your personal history.
  • Give two or three sentences about your career path.
  • Mention how you decided to apply to this job.
  • Leave enough curiosity that the interviewer becomes excited to learn more about you.

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Communication

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Confirm with everyone

It's not uncommon for hiring managers to hand you over to someone else on the team to meet you at the last minute. Send a quick email to encourage them to plan: 

Hi Kamala, I’m really excited to come in on Tuesday. I just wanted to confirm that I’ll be speaking with you and Jarrod. Could you please let me know if there’s anyone else I should look forward to meeting? Thanks so much!

Skim their history on LinkedIn, then move way down to the bottom. If they have endorsements and recommendations, it can give you a feel for their management style.

Twitter can help you guess at an interviewer's personality, interests, and values.

Think about the no.1 thing you really want to know. Line that question up to pose to the hiring manager. Just being curious is a marketable job skill.

For instance, the question could be about the expectations for the role, career advancement, something to help you understand the company culture, or even a qualitative question like, "Why do you see X as important?" 

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If you are convinced your ‘performance’ was a bad and it happens, you can still try to salvage it. A thank you note/email explaining a few things and showing your interest in the job might help change the interviewer’s mind. Botching up the interview does have a side effect: they would remember you!

Providing an honest reason for your bad performance can help, provided it’s not too long and boring. Do keep in mind that this is an effort from your side, and the rest of the factors are out of your control.

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IDEAS

Your purpose to the question "tell me about yourself" is to give just enough details of yourself to spark the interest of the interviewer.

Answering this question gives you a great opportunity to spotlight the skills and experience that make you the ideal candidate for the job.

Following up is a critical part to getting hired, yet it's often overlooked. The goal, Foggle says, is two-fold: to stay top-of-mind and restate your interest. For example: “Hi Tom, I’m just writing to let you know that I am still very interested in the position. Please let me know if I can offer any additional information, such as letters of recommendation, that might be useful.”

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