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Why office noise bothers some people more than others

Noise in the office

The open office sitting plan in many organizations has made some people lament on all kinds of office-specific noise they hear, and the kind of noise their neighboring colleagues make.

Noise-like office chatter, coughing and sneezing, loud phone ringtones, and conversations are considered problematic for the majority of office goers.

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Why office noise bothers some people more than others

Why office noise bothers some people more than others

https://www.bbc.com/worklife/article/20191115-office-noise-acceptable-levels-personality-type

bbc.com

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Key Ideas

Noise affects us differently

Some individuals like a certain office ambient noise, even music, as it makes them concentrate more, or provides a distraction, which is also needed.

Others have an extreme aversion, a sort of panic attack to distracting sounds, which is called Misophonia.

Extroverts and Introverts

Extroverts seek and find noisy environments comfortable, while introverts are the opposite, and run away to solitary comfort after interacting with people.

Introverts and noise

Introverts find it hard to concentrate and feel tired in a noisy environment, especially when mentally trying to calculate something.

People cannot switch off their brains to external noise, unable to focus on work. Office sounds that are similar to their own work will further annoy or confuse them.

Noisy environments

  • The Open office trend is seriously flawed is a majority of people have problems with the acoustics.
  • Not everyone works well in a noisy environment.
  • Companies can provide quieter areas for people averse to noise or for those who do certain specific tasks requiring focus.

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