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Calm for the holidays - Harvard Health Blog

Deep Breathing

When your emotions run high, breathing speeds up, too. Slowing your breathing down relaxes tense muscles, bringing shoulders down from ears, calms roiling emotions, and helps disarm the hormonal cascade within the body that feeds anxiety.

Just five minutes of deep breathing can calm you effectively.

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Calm for the holidays - Harvard Health Blog

Calm for the holidays - Harvard Health Blog

https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/calm-for-the-holidays-2018121015513

health.harvard.edu

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Key Ideas

Calm for the Holidays

A few quick ways to take holiday stress down, relax and invoke your calmer self:

  • Breathe deeply.
  • Exercise.
  • Diffuse charged conversations.

Deep Breathing

When your emotions run high, breathing speeds up, too. Slowing your breathing down relaxes tense muscles, bringing shoulders down from ears, calms roiling emotions, and helps disarm the hormonal cascade within the body that feeds anxiety.

Just five minutes of deep breathing can calm you effectively.

Move your body

Moving to do just about any exercise boosts your mood and manages your anxiety.

Just going for a walk can balance your emotions and provide positivity.

Diffuse Charged Conversations

Many relatives would tread into topics that are going to raise your blood pressure. Diffuse inflaming conversations and remain your calm self.

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