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How To Set Smart Daily Goals

Your motivation

It can be challenging to be productive in the long-term when you do things you don't feel motivated to do. Unless you have to push through with a specific task, it is much easier to work around things that keep you motivated.

Ask yourself: Why do you do this every single day?

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How To Set Smart Daily Goals

How To Set Smart Daily Goals

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Key Ideas

Busy with meaningless stuff

We can all feel very busy, but despite all this bustle, we often don’t feel particularly productive from day to day and often let the "big stuff" go unattended.

If we want to take back control of our priorities, we should relentlessly question how we're spending our time.

What you're currently doing

The act of becoming aware of where your attention is focused helps you to direct your attention where you want it to be - on creating something significant.

Setting time aside

To learn to control your attention, set aside at least one time period per day to focus without interruption. Let it be no more than 90 minutes at a time. Do something important but not urgent.

Ask yourself: Are you scheduling time daily to focus without interruption?

The one big thing

Incoming demands and digital distractions can get in the way of real productivity. If you do one big thing today, you will feel like it is a productive day.

Ask yourself: What’s the one big thing you want to accomplish today?

Your motivation

It can be challenging to be productive in the long-term when you do things you don't feel motivated to do. Unless you have to push through with a specific task, it is much easier to work around things that keep you motivated.

Ask yourself: Why do you do this every single day?

Moving forward

Before you allocate time to any task, question the intended outcome. Ensure that everything you say and do move the ball forward toward your goal.

Ask yourself: s what I’m about to do (or say) moving the ball forward?

Hard focus

This intense focus is at the center of completing outstanding work in a compact amount of time. However, focus requires training to develop.

To start, schedule a 20-minute block of undistracted work, and then add 10 minutes every two weeks.

Ask yourself: What is your training system for increasing your ability to focus hard on something without distraction?

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To break free from the temptation to compare, audit your social media feeds.

If you find yourself thinking about how your life matches up to a friend’s when you’re not on social media, try to shift your perspective. Think about their human traits, vulnerabilities, and things that you have in common. When you change your mindset, you can move from a place of jealousy to a place of empathy. 

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Turn Small Decisions Into Routines

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Make Big Decisions In The Morning

Save small decisions for after work (when decision fatigue kicks in) and to tackle complex decisions in the morning, when your mind is fresh

A similar strategy is to do some of the smaller things the night before to get a head start on the next day.

Pay Attention To Your Emotions

...and you'll able to look at decisions as objectively and rationally as possible.

Strong decision-makers know that a bad mood can make them lash out or stray from their moral compass just as easily as a good mood can make them overconfident and impulsive.

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