The Pleasure Center

The Pleasure Center

Social media rewards, like the number of views, comments or likes, engage us deeper into the virtual world, providing a sense of enjoyment via the 'dopamine' hits on the brain's pleasure center.

Social media occupies an average of 50% of the time spent each day with our smartphones.

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Problem Solving

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Not Really an Addiction

While being glued to smartphones may look like addiction, for most people it is just a behavior pattern, a habit that can be broken.

A set of people may be having a fixation with checking specific apps on the smartphone, like a gambling site or pornography.

Smartphone Addiction

There are about two billion smartphone users in the world, who check their devices on an average 85 times a day.

Checking your smartphone repeatedly is normally assumed as being addicted, especially in the younger age groups.

Smartphones may be on the verge of being an addiction for some people, but over time it will become less of a problem as the society will adjust to it, just like it did with computers.

We need to address the compulsive usage of youngsters if their activities are potentially time-wasting or can cause psychological or other health issues in the long run.

Obsessive Behaviour, Not Addiction
  • A smartphone is less of a real addiction and more of an obsessive behavior.
  • We get small 'dopamine' hits in our brains, every time we see a social media like or something that provides us with a reward.
  • We often use our smartphones as a weapon against boredom in public transport and boring tasks.
Addiction Defined

The World Health Organization defines addiction as physical and behavioral dependence on a substance.

An addiction can create psychological harm and many social problems with family and friends

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When you feel that itch or urge to go on YouTube, count to five. This will prepare your brain to make a choice, either do what you need to do or watch YouTube.

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Not backed up by science

While popular, researchers say there is a serious lack of evidence to back up mindfulness apps, even though they are increasingly perceived as proven treatments for mental health. 

Can Your Smartphone Make You Mindful?

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1. Remove unused apps

The first step to managing distractions on your phone is to remove the apps you no longer need.

  • These apps take up storage space in your phone’s memory and bandwidth when they update themselves.
  • But worst of all, these zombie apps fill your device with visual clutter and distraction .

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