deepstash

Beta

Yes, Free Will Exists

The World is an Illusion

According to the 19th-century philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer, the physical world is just an image, a perceptual representation of the world in the mind of the observer, and it is not how the world actually is.

47 SAVES


This is a professional note extracted from an online article.

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

Yes, Free Will Exists

Yes, Free Will Exists

https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/observations/yes-free-will-exists/

blogs.scientificamerican.com

4

Key Ideas

The Question of Free Will

The centuries-old question about human beings having free will or not is still unanswered but is fundamental for our moral codes, justice systems, religion and even the very meaning of life.

The argument about having predetermined choices amounting to not having free will does not hold upon careful reflection. Our definition of free will, and the existence of fate, is crucial for our understanding of whether life has any point at all.

Randomness and Determined Choice

Randomness is when things have no pattern in them. Our free-willed choices cannot be random as the process of randomness can produce any pattern whatsoever, by mere chance.

As determined or predetermined choices are by default not in free will, it is concluded that free will can neither be random nor determined.

Phenomenality

Our entire life is a stream of felt and perceived phenomenality. This is the content of consciousness, something that fills all metaphysics and materialism. 

We feel all our emotional states like fears, desires, inclinations, and these states are not merely neurons firing in our brains, at least how we experience them, known as 'felt volitional states'.

The World is an Illusion

According to the 19th-century philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer, the physical world is just an image, a perceptual representation of the world in the mind of the observer, and it is not how the world actually is.

EXPLORE MORE AROUND THESE TOPICS:

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

One of the reasons why Stoicism is enjoying a revival today is that it gives concrete answers to moral questions.
Aristotle gave us an alternative conception of happiness

It cannot be acquired by pleasurable experiences but only by identifying and realizing our own potential, moral and creative, in our specific environments, with our particular family, friends and colleagues, and helping others to do so. 

Fasting....

...is the voluntary withholding of food for spiritual, health, or other reasons.

Food is easily available, but you choose not to eat it. This can be for any period of time, from...

Intermittent fasting for weight loss

When we fast, Insulin levels fall, signaling the body to start burning stored energy as no more is coming through food. Blood glucose falls, so the body must now pull glucose out of storage to burn for energy.

In essence, intermittent fasting allows the body to use its stored energy. 

Health benefits of intermittent fasting
  • Weight and body fat loss
  • Lowered blood insulin and sugar levels 
  • Possibly reversal of type 2 diabetes
  • Possibly improved mental clarity and concentration
  • Possibly increased energy
  • Possibly increased growth hormone, at least in the short term
  • Possibly an improved blood cholesterol profile
  • Possibly a reduction in the risk of Alzheimer’s disease 
  • Possibly longer life
  • Possibly activation of cellular cleansing by stimulating autophagy
  • Possibly reduction of inflammation

3 more ideas

Humour in philosophy
Humour in philosophy
  • Henri Bergson, a Fresh philosopher of the late 19th century, was also an author of a famous essay that focused on laughter. Before Bergson, few philosophers had given laughter much t...
Humour and respect

Everyone who ever had to explain their own joke knows that comedy cannot survive analysis. Once you take humour apart, it loses its effect and dies in the process.

Henri Bergson published his essay on laughter in 1900. He believed that laughter should be studied as 'a living thing' and treated with 'the respect due to life.'

Conditions for laughter to thrive

Henri Bergson's general observations related to when laughter is most likely to appear and thrive:

  • The comic is strictly human. When laughter is directed at non-humans, we may laugh, but only because we have detected some human attitude or expression.
  • Laughter has no greater foe than emotion. Emotional states like pity, melancholy, rage, etc. make it difficult for us to find humour in the things we might otherwise have laughed at. But humour also appears to serve as a coping mechanism in the face of tragedy or misfortune.
  • Laughter seems to require an echo. It is used in the context of social bonding.

2 more ideas