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Yes, Free Will Exists

https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/observations/yes-free-will-exists/

blogs.scientificamerican.com

Yes, Free Will Exists
At least since the Enlightenment, in the 18th century, one of the most central questions of human existence has been whether we have free will. In the late 20th century, some thought neuroscience had settled the question. However, as it has recently become clear, such was not the case.

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The Question of Free Will

The centuries-old question about human beings having free will or not is still unanswered but is fundamental for our moral codes, justice systems, religion and even the very meaning of life.

The argument about having predetermined choices amounting to not having free will does not hold upon careful reflection. Our definition of free will, and the existence of fate, is crucial for our understanding of whether life has any point at all.

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Randomness and Determined Choice

Randomness is when things have no pattern in them. Our free-willed choices cannot be random as the process of randomness can produce any pattern whatsoever, by mere chance.

As determined or predetermined choices are by default not in free will, it is concluded that free will can neither be random nor determined.

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Phenomenality

Our entire life is a stream of felt and perceived phenomenality. This is the content of consciousness, something that fills all metaphysics and materialism. 

We feel all our emotional states like fears, desires, inclinations, and these states are not merely neurons firing in our brains, at least how we experience them, known as 'felt volitional states'.

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The World is an Illusion

According to the 19th-century philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer, the physical world is just an image, a perceptual representation of the world in the mind of the observer, and it is not how the world actually is.

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