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Productivity shame: Why you never feel like you've done "enough"

Causes of Productivity Shame

  • We link our products to our self-worth, thinking that we need to get more done, and our self-esteem depends upon it.
  • We set unrealistic goals, which can be discouraging for us if we keep on focusing on the end result.
  • We compare ourselves with others, who seemingly are doing better and are more productive.

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Productivity shame: Why you never feel like you've done "enough"

Productivity shame: Why you never feel like you've done "enough"

https://blog.rescuetime.com/productivity-shame/

blog.rescuetime.com

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Key Ideas

The Spiral of Productivity Shame

Productivity shame is a feeling that you are not doing enough, whatever the number of hours you are working, or the number of tasks you are crossing off your to-do list. It also means you feel guilty when you rest or take time off watching a movie or just play around for a while. All of this is harmful and can lead to stress and burnout.

Productivity shame creates a cycle of failure and is a terrible and negative approach towards getting others to work.

Causes of Productivity Shame

  • We link our products to our self-worth, thinking that we need to get more done, and our self-esteem depends upon it.
  • We set unrealistic goals, which can be discouraging for us if we keep on focusing on the end result.
  • We compare ourselves with others, who seemingly are doing better and are more productive.

Overcoming Productivity Shame

  • Disconnect your Self-worth from your achievements.
  • Set realistic, effective goals: The three elements of goal-setting are knowing what you want to achieve, how you're going to get there, and why you want to achieve something. If you have a compelling reason and motivation, go for it.
  • Appreciate progress: Consistent progress aids productivity better than the achieving of goals. 

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  • Focus on one thing at a time, to avoid feeling overwhelmed
  • Take breaks
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Habits Are Not Blind Routines

Conventional wisdom states that strong habits improve our productivity. Daily habits done in an autopilot mode are not the only route to peak performance.

While our habits help us stick to g...

Revisit What You Do Daily
  • Some of our daily to-dos should not require a constant daily effort and could be optimized further. Look for such habits and if the daily effort is straining you, look for other innovative solutions.

  • Time and Energy are limited resources, and as we grow, our habits may become obsolete. We could use the same time and energy to explore new and better options.

  • It is a good idea to pay attention to where we spend our time and see if there is something we do daily but have outgrown long ago.

Consistency and Boredom

Being consistent can also lead to burnout and lack of growth, and to be creative and innovative, we sometimes need a break from our daily activity. When we stop and do something new, we start to be part of a creative process, instead of simply repeating the same thing every day.

The key is to not rely on a rigid consistency but to be resilient enough to withstand any breaks. Our resilient habits are usually the old ones and have some psychological rewards while involving some external accountability. 

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The weekly review

It’s dedicated time to think about the past week, reflect on what went well and what didn’t, and plan for the week ahead. 

It’s a chance to get aligned with your goals and ensure ...

The 3 parts of a weekly review
  • Get Clear: process all your loose-ends.
  • Get Current: make sure all your items are up to date.
  • Get Creative: come up with new ideas to improve how you live and work.
Benefits of weekly reviews
  • You gain an objective view of the week: a weekly review forces you to practice intention by taking time to pause and reflect as you consider what you did versus what you planned to do.
  • You become proactive in planning: a weekly review isn’t only a retrospective, but a prospective too. It lets you run through the upcoming Monday to Friday proactively.

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