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The Wrong Eating Habits Can Hurt Your Brain, Not Just Your Waistline

Being overweight affects the brain

A diet high in saturated fats and sugars affects your blood pressure, cholesterol, and blood sugar levels. It also affects the parts of the brain that are important to memory.

  • A 2015 study found obese children performed worse on memory tasks than children who weren't overweight.
  • Another study found obese people have less white matter in their brains than their lean peers - as if their brains were ten years older.
  • A recent study supports one prominent theory that high body mass is linked to inflammation, which affects the brain.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

The Wrong Eating Habits Can Hurt Your Brain, Not Just Your Waistline

The Wrong Eating Habits Can Hurt Your Brain, Not Just Your Waistline

https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/12/30/506433671/the-wrong-eating-habits-can-hurt-your-brain-not-just-your-waistline

npr.org

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Key Ideas

Being overweight affects the brain

A diet high in saturated fats and sugars affects your blood pressure, cholesterol, and blood sugar levels. It also affects the parts of the brain that are important to memory.

  • A 2015 study found obese children performed worse on memory tasks than children who weren't overweight.
  • Another study found obese people have less white matter in their brains than their lean peers - as if their brains were ten years older.
  • A recent study supports one prominent theory that high body mass is linked to inflammation, which affects the brain.

Memory problems

Obese people find it more difficult to pick apart spatial, item, and temporal memory, as well as the ability to integrate them.

If you're obese, you might be up to 20 percent more likely not to remember where you put your keys.

Changing eating habits

The diet of obese people degrades their memory and makes them more likely to overeat, a study revealed.

Making a meal more memorable may help to eat less bad stuff. If you watch TV while you eat, you'll eat more than planned.

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Even a single occasion of increased glucose levels in the blood can harm your brain. It can impair your memory and attention.

High sugar consumption causes inflammation in the brain. But, it can be reversed by following a low-sugar, low-GI diet.

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But in today’s food culture, many people seem to have acquired uncannily homogenous tastes: food companies push foods high in sugar, fat and salt, which means we are innately incapable of resisting them but that the more frequently we eat them, especially in childhood, the more they train us to expect all food to taste this way.

0.3% of young women are anorexic

... and another 1% are bulimic, with rising numbers of men joining them.

What statistics are not particularly effective at telling us is how many others – whether overweight or underweight – are in a perpetual state of anxiety about what they consume, living in fear of carbs or fat grams and unable to derive straightforward enjoyment from meals.

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