Learning Slows Down with Age - Deepstash

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How Does Age Change How You Learn? | Scott H Young

Learning Slows Down with Age

Learning Slows Down with Age

Most aspects of mental processing slow down as we age. While we continue to accumulate knowledge of the world at a slower rate, we gain more experience that increases our wisdom.

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