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Mindfulness In The Time Of Crisis

Things we can't control

There are so many things we cannot control in times of health crisis (coworkers that come to work with a headache and a fever, people that sneeze or cough in public, etc.)
Instead of stressing over these things, it's best to focus our attention on the things we can do and control (i.e. in the case of the new virus, handwashing has been recognized as a first-line defense in disease prevention).

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Mindfulness In The Time Of Crisis

Mindfulness In The Time Of Crisis

https://thoughtcatalog.com/christa-rogers/2020/02/mindfulness-in-the-time-of-coronavirus/

thoughtcatalog.com

3

Key Ideas

Handwashing and mindfulness

Wash your hands with intentions and thoroughness:

  • Stand in front of the sink and release the tension from your shoulders and smile.
  • Turn on the faucet and considering what a privilege it is to have warm, running water.
  • Listen to the sound of the water.
  • Using soap, warm water, and friction, give your hands a little massage, which helps to relieve stress.
  • Wash your hand for 20 seconds.
  • Notice and enjoy the feeling of your clean, dry hands.

Be aware of your hands

Increased awareness of your hands throughout the day can help you avoid touching your mouth, eyes, and nose.

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