The Right Time And Place - Deepstash

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How To Kindly Correct Someone When They're Wrong

The Right Time And Place

Pull the person you want to correct aside for a private, one-on-one conversation instead of highlighting their error in front of a larger group.
Also, to correct them before they get in trouble for their mistake. A little embarrassment right now will save them even greater mortification in the long run.

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Start With Something Positive

When telling someone he's wrong, don't be too direct with your approach:

Before jumping right in with something like, “This is really wrong!”, try saying, “It’s evident that yo...

Avoid Sounding Authoritative

Being overly authoritative, confrontational, and closed-minded when making a correction will only make you look pretentious and condescending. 

Be open for discussion and try saying “I’m looking at page 10 of this document, and something’s not quite matching up for me. Can we take a quick look at this part together?”

Incorporate Questions

Phrasing things as inquiries, rather than statements, makes it obvious that your intention is to facilitate a conversation that ultimately improves the end result—not just dole out strict demands.

Milton Friedman

"The best measure of quality thinking is your ability to accurately predict the consequences of your ideas a..."

Milton Friedman
Think in Years, Not Days

Before jumping to a conclusion, think about the long-term consequences of your decision.

We may respect those able to fling themselves into a hard problem and make a quick choice with seemingly little thought, but making a meaningful decision needs to be done with care for the long-term effects.

Understand Decision Fatigue

It’s important to be aware of what state of mind you’re in before tackling a hard choice.

Decision fatigue happens when the mental energy required to weigh the tradeoffs of our decision becomes too much for us to handle. 

Let it Go

Interruptions can be frustrating. But, the point here is that not all of them are worthy of addressing.

Sometimes, the best thing you can do when faced with an interruption is nothing at all,...

Set Expectations From The Beginning

Whether you’re speaking up in a team meeting or you’re conducting a presentation, it’s important to be clear that you'll need to get all of your ideas out there before opening the floor to questions and contributions. 

This sets the tone right from the get-go that you’re aiming to share your ideas free of interruptions. This also makes it easy to halt an interrupter in his tracks.

Keep Going

Sometimes you can only fight fire with fire.

Refuse to pause for interruptions, and instead continue moving forward with your ideas. If needed, you can even pause for a second to address the interrupter and say, “one moment,” and then finish off your thought.