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How To Kindly Correct Someone When They're Wrong

Use Clarifying Questions

They will help you to:

  • Gut-check our own correction. Hearing another person's reasoning might get you to realize that you are actually the one who's wrong.
  • It makes you seem more aggressive and the person that did wrong might accept your help to make the necessary corrections.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

How To Kindly Correct Someone When They're Wrong

How To Kindly Correct Someone When They're Wrong

https://blog.trello.com/kindly-correct-someone-wrong

blog.trello.com

4

Key Ideas

The Right Time And Place

Pull the person you want to correct aside for a private, one-on-one conversation instead of highlighting their error in front of a larger group.
Also, to correct them before they get in trouble for their mistake. A little embarrassment right now will save them even greater mortification in the long run.

Use Clarifying Questions

They will help you to:

  • Gut-check our own correction. Hearing another person's reasoning might get you to realize that you are actually the one who's wrong.
  • It makes you seem more aggressive and the person that did wrong might accept your help to make the necessary corrections.

Back Up Your Point With Evidence

When you’re correcting someone , be prepared to back up your point with real evidence, and not just your well-intended opinion.
Real data that supports your point is the single best way to correct false information.

Offer To Help

To be a real team player, offer to help get the things on the right patch.
Lend a hand in repairing a situation will emphasize collaboration over competition and it will make you far more pleasant to work with to boot.

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Be open for discussion and try saying “I’m looking at page 10 of this document, and something’s not quite matching up for me. Can we take a quick look at this part together?”

Incorporate Questions

Phrasing things as inquiries, rather than statements, makes it obvious that your intention is to facilitate a conversation that ultimately improves the end result—not just dole out strict demands.

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Staying Up To Date

Remote workers can feel overwhelmed by the amount of text they have to process. So finding ways to keep on top of what's going on is imperative for communicating efficiently with others.

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This sets the tone right from the get-go that you’re aiming to share your ideas free of interruptions. This also makes it easy to halt an interrupter in his tracks.

Keep Going

Sometimes you can only fight fire with fire.

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Say what the problem is

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Make it clear that your goal is constructive change.

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... when telling someone they're wrong.

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Be realistic about the risks

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Decide whether to wait

You may decide to hold off voicing your opinion if you want to gather your army first. People can contribute experience or information to your thinking — all the things that would make the disagreement stronger or more valid. 

Also, delay the conversation if you’re in a meeting or other public space. Discussing the issue in private will make the powerful person feel less threatened.

Identify a shared goal

Before you share your thoughts, think about what the powerful person cares about. You’re more likely to be heard if you can connect your disagreement to a “higher purpose.” 

State it overtly then, contextualizing your statements so that you’re seen not as a disagreeable underling but as a colleague who’s trying to advance a shared goal. 

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How to convince someone when facts fail
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