The Learning Model - Deepstash

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"The capacity to learn is a gift; The ability to learn is a skill; The willingness to learn is a choice."

The Learning Model

The Learning Model

The “conscious competence” learning model is a way to learn new skills in the future, having 4 stages:

  1. Unconscious Incompetence
  2. Conscious Incompetence
  3. Conscious Competence
  4. Unconscious Competence

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"The capacity to learn is a gift; The ability to learn is a skill; The willingness to learn is a choice."

"The capacity to learn is a gift; The ability to learn is a skill; The willingness to learn is a choice."

https://harmoniousresolutions.com/2017/07/26/the-capacity-to-learn-is-a-gift-the-ability-to-learn-is-a-skill-the-willingness-to-learn-is-a-choice-brian-herbert/

harmoniousresolutions.com

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Key Ideas

Brain Herbert

Brain Herbert

“The capacity to learn is a gift; The ability to learn is a skill; The willingness to learn is a choice.”

The Learning Model

The “conscious competence” learning model is a way to learn new skills in the future, having 4 stages:

  1. Unconscious Incompetence
  2. Conscious Incompetence
  3. Conscious Competence
  4. Unconscious Competence

Unconscious Incompetence

Stage One of this learning model is Unconscious Incompetence, where you are clueless and overwhelmed and don't know why.

In this stage: You don't know what you don't know.

Conscious Incompetence

Start to diagnose and find what the problem is. Once you know and acknowledge the problem, you also know the skill you need to master to be able to handle the problem. 

You are at Stage Two: Conscious Incompetence. In this stage, you know what you don't know.

Conscious Competence

In Stage Three: Conscious Competence, you are aware of the problem and start to design and implement a strategy to tackle it. 

You are determined, willing to learn, and overcome any challenges to master the skill(s). This is when you know what you know.

Unconscious Competence

Stage Four: Unconscious Competence, is when you are skillfully, naturally, and easily able to handle the problem, without any mental effort. The skill that you have learned are now imbibed in you.  In this stage, you don't know what you know.

This Learning Model can be used to break old habits and acquire new skills if implemented with focus and awareness.

Let's imagine this scenario: You've been feeling overwhelmed and stressed during the last few weekends and you don't know why. You are at stage # 1, Unconscious Incompetence (You don't know...

Let's imagine this scenario: You've been feeling overwhelmed and stressed during the last few weekends and you don't know why. You are at stage # 1, Unconscious Incompetence (You don't know what you don't know).

After you skillfully say "No" about 50 times to 30 different people, you become a master of saying 'No'. It comes without mental effort on your part and it happens fast, naturally, easily, and grac...

After you skillfully say "No" about 50 times to 30 different people, you become a master of saying 'No'. It comes without mental effort on your part and it happens fast, naturally, easily, and graciously. You arrive at stage # 4, Unconscious Competence! (You don't know what you know). What a great place to be in!

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Learning how to learn

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Learning skills

Learning how to learn is critical for everyone. Most of us have to deal with a changing world and to learn how to manage tons of new information.

However, most of our learning methods are outdated and far from optimal. It may even be giving us an illusion of learning, like re-reading and highlighting that don't provide proper feedback to show what you haven't learned.

Focused and Diffuse Mode

Focused and diffuse modes provide two models for how we develop, elaborate, deepen and broaden connections. Both methods are important.

  • The focused mode of learning is about bringing related concepts together into a unit, called a chunk. 
  • The diffuse mode operates through a wider net of connecting general ideas across different fields. We use this diffuse mode while we sleep, exercise or daydream.

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The Flow State

Flow is characterized by complete concentration in the activity at hand, resulting in a loss in one’s sense of space and time. It’s a state of both high challenge and high skill—a place where we’re...

The Six Parts of A Flow State
  1. Intense concentration on the task at hand.
  2. A merging of action and awareness - “being and doing become one”.
  3. A loss of reflective self-consciousness.
  4. A sense of personal control over the situation.
  5. A distortion of the perception of time.
  6. Autotelic experience: the activity itself is intrinsically rewarding, rather than the expected outcome.
What Flow Is Not
  • It’s not easyFlow is not just a state where we love the work so much it just pours out. Flow is a state where hard work meets joy and meaning. 
  • It’s not for beginners. The act of learning how to do something won’t always allow us to get into the flow. Getting into the zone in a specific discipline is something that needs to be learned and practiced.

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Meta-Learning

It's knowing how to learn. Learning itself is a skill, and knowing how to do it well is an incredibly valuable advantage.

Merely acquiring information is not learning....

Learning has 2 phases

Learning is a two-step process:

  • Read/listen: feeding ourselves new information.
  • Process and recall what you’ve just ‘learned’: connecting new materials to what we already knew.
Remembering the right things

You should not waste your time by committing unimportant details to memory. 

Your focus should be on understanding the bigger picture, on how things relate to each other.

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Learning Drives Adaptability

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Companies Want Avid Lifelong Learners

The skills gap is often defined as the difference between the skills future workers have and the skills employers seek in new hires. But the skills gap also exists for the already employed workers and can keep growing unless they keep their skills up to date.

Curiosity Is Career Fuel

Understanding how your efforts fit into the bigger picture will give your work more meaning and give you new ideas to apply, so you don’t burn out or stagnate. Learning about something you’re curious about, even if it’s not useful to your job, expands your thinking, and impacts everything you do.

What Time Management Is

Time is our precious resource. It is perishable, it is irreplaceable, and it cannot be saved. It can only be reallocated from activities of lower value to activities of higher value.

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Eat That Frog!

Your “frog” is your most important task, the one you are most likely to procrastinate on if you don’t do something about it.

If you have two important tasks, start your day with the biggest, hardest, and most important task first. Focus on completing it before you go to the next one.

Failure to execute

We tend to confuse activity with accomplishment: we attend endless meetings and make plans, but at the end of the day, no one does the job and gets the results required.

“Failure to execute” is among the biggest problems in organizations today.

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Albert Einstein

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Albert Einstein
Daniel Coyle
Daniel Coyle

"Our brains evolved to learn by doing things, not by hearing about them. This is one of the reasons that, for a lot of skills, it’s much better to spend about two thirds of your time testing yourself on it rather than absorbing it."

Telling Others About Your Pursuit

It can keep you accountable, but it can also lead to a false sense of completeness. One way to avoid sabotaging yourself is to state your goal as a commitment rather than progress towards the finished product.

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The reason for the question

Interviewers ask questions like "tell me about yourself "  to determine if you're qualified to do the work and if you will fit in with the team.

How to Answer the Question

It might be a good idea to share something about yourself that is doesn't relate directly to your career. 

For example, interests like running might represent that you are healthy and energetic. Pursuits like being an avid reader might showcase your intellectual leaning. Volunteer work will demonstrate your commitment to the welfare of your community.

The “present-past-future” formula

This is a simple formula to construct your response.

  • Start with a short overview of where you are now (which could include your current job along with a reference to a personal hobby or passion).
  • Reference how you got to where you are (you could mention education, or an important experience, internship or volunteer experience).
  • Finish by describing a probable goal for the future.

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