deepstash

Beta

Get an account to save ideas & make your own & organize them how you wish.

STASHES TO GET YOU STARTED

© Brainstash, Inc

deepstash

Beta

It's Harder for Millennials to Stay Thin Than It Was for Boomers

Chemicalization Of Us

A new study reveals that even though we are exercising and eating at the same levels as 30 years ago, we are not able to sustain our weights like before, leading to obesity and other disorders. The reasons for this phenomenon:

  1. More exposure to chemicals(packaged foods, pesticides) leading to hormonal changes.
  2. Prescription drugs which have exotic side-effects.
  3. Processed foods, especially those with artificial sweeteners, which are mutating our microbiome (gut bacteria).

41 SAVES


This is a professional note extracted from an online article.

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

It's Harder for Millennials to Stay Thin Than It Was for Boomers

It's Harder for Millennials to Stay Thin Than It Was for Boomers

https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2015/09/why-it-was-easier-to-be-skinny-in-the-1980s/407974/

theatlantic.com

1

Key Idea

Chemicalization Of Us

A new study reveals that even though we are exercising and eating at the same levels as 30 years ago, we are not able to sustain our weights like before, leading to obesity and other disorders. The reasons for this phenomenon:

  1. More exposure to chemicals(packaged foods, pesticides) leading to hormonal changes.
  2. Prescription drugs which have exotic side-effects.
  3. Processed foods, especially those with artificial sweeteners, which are mutating our microbiome (gut bacteria).

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Fiber gap

Only 5 percent of people in the US meet the Institute of Medicine’s recommended daily target of 25 grams for women and 38 grams for men. That amounts to a population-wide deficiency.

Benefits of a fiber-rich diet

Eating a fiber-rich diet is associated with better gastrointestinal health and a reduced risk of heart attacks, strokes, high cholesterol, obesity, type 2 diabetes, even some cancers. Fiber slows the absorption of glucose — which evens out our blood sugar levels — and also lowers cholesterol and inflammation.

Fiber doesn’t just help us poop better — it also nourishes our gut microbiome.

Processed foods and fiber

Instead of munching on fruits, vegetables, beans, nuts, and seeds, more than half of the calories Americans consume come from ultra-processed foods. On any given day, nearly 40 percent of Americans eat fast food. These prepared and processed meals tend to be low in fiber, or even fiber free. 

2 more ideas

Best foods don’t have labels

Best foods don’t have labels
Because they are just one ingredient: avocado, lentils, blueberries, broccoli, almonds, etc.

There is no "best diet"

The “best” diet is a theme: an emphasis on vegetables, fruits, whole grains, beans, lentils, nuts, seeds, and plain water for thirst. 

That can be with or without seafood; with or without dairy; with or without eggs; with or without some meat; high or low in total fat.

The "Age" of vegetables

The best vegetables are likely to be fresh and locally sourced, but flash frozen is nearly as good (as freezing delays aging). Those “fresh” vegetables that spend a long time in storage or transit are probably the least nutritious.

7 more ideas

The Reality Behind Supplements

Studies demonstrate that multivitamins don't improve outcomes on a number of health measures, from staving off cognitive decline to preventing cardiovascular disease and cancer. The health b...

Beware Of Supplements’ Claims

In the US, supplements are regulated like food — and not drugs — under the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994, pill makers can basically put whatever claims they want on their bottles.

One analysis of supplement websites found 81 percent made at least one health claim — and more than half of those promised to treat, prevent, diagnose, or cure specific diseases. But a quick thought exercise will tell you that if these pills were truly panaceas, the FDA would have to treat them like drugs, not foods.

Resist The Urge For a Quick Fix

Back when undernutrition and vitamin deficiencies were widespread, supplements made some sense. But now one of the more urgent health problems is obesity and overnutrition while a growing body of studies shows that supplements’ effects are minimal or negative. 

Remember that you can’t know for sure what's really in your supplement bottle. And that the pills probably won't make you any healthier (unless you have a medically diagnosed deficiency). And they might even be hurting you.