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Are You Reading Instead of Taking Action?

Reading vs doing

Reading about self-improvement can be a compliment or a substitute for taking action.

  • A complement view to self-improvement writing is that it should aid with personal development - the more books you read, the more likely you are to work on improving yourself.
  • With substitutes, we really want that good feeling that we're doing something to improve our personal development. Reading about improvement can fill that need even though the challenges we're facing aren't being resolved immediately.

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    Are You Reading Instead of Taking Action?

    Are You Reading Instead of Taking Action?

    https://medium.com/swlh/are-you-reading-instead-of-taking-action-df7ed894bbf7

    medium.com

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    Key Ideas

    Reading vs doing

    Reading about self-improvement can be a compliment or a substitute for taking action.

    • A complement view to self-improvement writing is that it should aid with personal development - the more books you read, the more likely you are to work on improving yourself.
    • With substitutes, we really want that good feeling that we're doing something to improve our personal development. Reading about improvement can fill that need even though the challenges we're facing aren't being resolved immediately.

      The dominating factor

      To find out if the substitute or complement dominates will depend on many factors.

      • The material itself. Some types of self-improvement provide a large emotional payoff but are weak on substantial follow-up. They don't make good complements.
      • The Nature of the self-improvement task. Some types of self-improvement work are difficult. In those areas, it might be easier to consume self-improvement material instead.

      The problem with substitution

      Without doing and solving the main issue, more information will only be counterproductive.

      Trying to offer encouragement may be harmful in the long-run. The best treatment involves confronting the anxiety and not to reduce the tension by consolation. By offering sympathy, you are escaping from your anxiety - a short-term relief that reinforces the pattern of the original stress.

      Effort

      Consider how much effort you're putting in to actively work on the areas you're reading about.

      If you are working little on the areas you've identified, but spending a significant amount of time-consuming information, you may be having some kind of substitution effect.

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      Remembering the right things

      You should not waste your time by committing unimportant details to memory. 

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      The Outline/List

      Is a linear method of taking notes that proceeds down the page, using indentation or bullets to denote major and minor points.

      Pros: it records content relationship in a way tha...

      The Sentence Method

      The goal is to jot down your thoughts as quickly as possible. Format is kept to a minimum: every new thought is written on a new line. 

      Pros: Is like free writing for notes.

      Cons: lack organization and notes can be hard to understand.

      Works for: meetings or lectures that lack organization; when information is presented very quickly.

      SQ3R (Survey, Question, Read, Recite, Review)
      • Skim the material for bolded text, images, summaries, to produce a list of headlines;
      • Each headline is then written in the form of a question;
      • Record your “answers” to the reading questions under each corresponding header;
      • Once you’ve finished reading the text, write a summary of the material from memory—this is the “recite” part of the process. 
      • Finally, review your notes to make sure you’ve completely grasped the concepts.

      Works for: dense written material.

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      Adapting to context

      Different types of information demand different styles of note-taking. There are lots of reasons to take notes: to retain information, to capture ideas, to problem solve or brainstorm, to visualiz...