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How To Be More Assertive - Darius Foroux

Assertiveness

Assertiveness

Assertiveness is behaving in one's own best interests, standing up for oneself without being anxious or guilty, expressing one's honest feelings comfortably, and exercising one's right without denying others theirs.

Practice assertiveness by being firm and demanding yet soft, direct and respectful.

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How To Be More Assertive - Darius Foroux

How To Be More Assertive - Darius Foroux

https://dariusforoux.com/how-to-be-assertive/

dariusforoux.com

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Key Ideas

Three Types of Behaviour

  1. Passive behavior: it isn't honest but geared towards being nice to others.
  2. Assertive behavior: it is direct and honest, respecting others but focusing on the self.
  3. Aggressive behavior: it is harmful, egoistic and is about controlling others.

The Middle Path

Most people are either passive or aggressive. Passive people are afraid of confrontation and lie easily.
Aggressive people are not liked, as they can trample others for their own benefit.

The middle ground, assertiveness, is where you want to be: Respectful, firm, observant, and detached.

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