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Six Habits of Highly Compassionate People

The Four Components Of Compassion

  • Cognitive: Recognition of suffering.
  • Affective: Arising of emotion.
  • Intention: A desire for relief from suffering.
  • Motivation: Action to remove suffering.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

Six Habits of Highly Compassionate People

Six Habits of Highly Compassionate People

https://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/six_habits_of_highly_compassionate_people

greatergood.berkeley.edu

3

Key Ideas

Being Compassionate

Compassion can be understood as a mental state of cognitive recognition of suffering, with an emotional feeling, and a desire to do something to end that suffering.

Everyone of us has some level of compassion built in, but no one was taught in school how to intentionally strengthen such inner skills.

The Four Components Of Compassion

  • Cognitive: Recognition of suffering.
  • Affective: Arising of emotion.
  • Intention: A desire for relief from suffering.
  • Motivation: Action to remove suffering.

Six Ways To Compassion

  • Try research-tested compassion practices, like writing exercises.
  • Informal compassion: Be aware of the people around you, and acknowledge the interdependence with everyone.
  • Set up an intention: Find out what you want for yourself, your life, and what you have to offer the world. 
  • First-hand self-knowledge: Instead of following ready-made knowledge, find out what works for you through self-examination.
  • Get support: Find support in your peers, friends, and relatives, to help make compassion a habit.
  • Self-compassion: Stick to the practice even when it's hard and be gentle to yourself. 

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attributed to Aristotle
attributed to Aristotle
“We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence then, is not an act, but a habit.”
Confucius
Confucius
“Men’s natures are alike; it is their habits that separate them.”

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