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Warnings From Sleep: Nightmares and Protecting The Self

Nightmares

Nightmares

Nightmares happen later in sleep when dreams are longest, and the content is bizarre and emotional. Nightmares wake the sleeper into full consciousness and clear memory of the dream. It temporarily relieves the negative emotion.

As we develop the skills for managing negative emotions while we are awake, nightmares will reduce in frequency.

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Warnings From Sleep: Nightmares and Protecting The Self

Warnings From Sleep: Nightmares and Protecting The Self

https://fs.blog/2017/04/nightmares-and-protecting-the-self/

fs.blog

3

Key Ideas

Trauma and nightmares

Nightmares appear to be more common in those who have intense reactions to stress. When our time awake is frightening or remains unpressed, the sleeping brain may produce horrible images to awaken a sleeper.

The more trauma we have in our lives, the more likely we are to experience anxiety and nightmares.

The effects of trauma on sleep

If an action against the threat is irrelevant or impossible - as it would be if the trauma happened long ago - then emotion-coping efforts like dreaming may be useful to get on with our lives.

If the threat will be encountered repeatedly, such as abuse, then waking problem-solving action is necessary.

Nightmares

Nightmares happen later in sleep when dreams are longest, and the content is bizarre and emotional. Nightmares wake the sleeper into full consciousness and clear memory of the dream. It temporarily relieves the negative emotion.

As we develop the skills for managing negative emotions while we are awake, nightmares will reduce in frequency.

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