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Why do we find circles so beautiful?

The attraction of the circle

Taking into account that our own eyes function based on the existence of spheres, such as the iris or the pupil, there is no wonder that we all are, as individuals, prone to choose circular lines over straight ones.

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Why do we find circles so beautiful?

Why do we find circles so beautiful?

https://www.sciencefocus.com/science/why-do-we-find-circles-so-beautiful/

sciencefocus.com

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Key Ideas

A preference for circles

Over the years, research has shown that individuals tend not only to prefer contoured lines over straight ones but also to associate more joyful feelings with the first ones.

Furthermore, a recent study has proven that people's preference for curved real objects has not changed a bit. We tend, it seems, to identify angular shapes with fear, aversion, and dislike, while circles bring to our mind feels like safety and peacefulness.

Favoring the round-shaped items

According to research in the field, people have the tendency to associate happiness with circles and anger with triangles.

This seems to find its meaning in individuals' attraction to the roundness of a child's face, as, involuntarily, we associate innocence and honesty to round-shaped items.

The attraction of the circle

Taking into account that our own eyes function based on the existence of spheres, such as the iris or the pupil, there is no wonder that we all are, as individuals, prone to choose circular lines over straight ones.

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