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Why Too Much Empathy Can Actually Be Harmful

The threats of being emphatic

While empathy can make both you and the ones around feel better at times, there are also important dangers worth taking into account:

  • Empathy can often lead to unjustified anger
  • It can cause guilt and thinking that your own happiness has come at the cost or may have even caused another person's misery.
  • it can result in a great amount of fatigue.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

Why Too Much Empathy Can Actually Be Harmful

Why Too Much Empathy Can Actually Be Harmful

https://www.thoughtco.com/the-difference-between-empathy-and-sympathy-4154381

thoughtco.com

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Key Ideas

Sympathy vs. empathy

Although many people tend to confuse the notions of empathy and sympathy, these two are quite different.

While sympathy implies only the fact of feeling concerned about someone, empathy goes way beyond that and it might result in harming the person who is displaying and feeling it.

The three types of empathy

Empathy is the ability to share another person's emotions after having reached a good understanding of their suffering. There are three main types of empathy:

  • Cognitive empathy, which is defined as the ability to understand and to share someone else's emotions by imagining one's self in their shoes
  • Emotional empathy, which is based on shared feelings
  • Compassionate empathy, which is characterized by the need to actually help the other.

The threats of being emphatic

While empathy can make both you and the ones around feel better at times, there are also important dangers worth taking into account:

  • Empathy can often lead to unjustified anger
  • It can cause guilt and thinking that your own happiness has come at the cost or may have even caused another person's misery.
  • it can result in a great amount of fatigue.

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