Tackling Your Anxiety - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

Get an account to save ideas & make your own & organize them how you wish.

deepstash

Beta

How to Stop an Anxiety Spiral

Tackling Your Anxiety

  • Reach out to a mental health professional, even if you can’t meet with them in person.
  • Reframe the virus outbreak by temporal distancing, or by focusing your attention on a longer timescale.
  • Try putting the outbreak in historical context (there have been many pandemics during our history).
  • Limit how much information you consume about the new virus outbreak. Find the right balance between being informed and being overwhelmed.

99 SAVES


This is a professional note extracted from an online article.

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

How to Stop an Anxiety Spiral

How to Stop an Anxiety Spiral

https://www.wired.com/story/how-to-stop-coronavirus-anxiety-spiral/

wired.com

3

Key Ideas

Why A Pandemic Is Uniquely Stressful

  • All of our attention is being focused on the threatening aspects of the situation.
  • Headlines are dominated by places where the pandemic is currently hitting the hardest.
  • Our usual routines are no longer safe.
  • The safety measures people are taking may be more immediate and visible.
  • We don’t have much control over the situation.

Tackling Your Anxiety

  • Reach out to a mental health professional, even if you can’t meet with them in person.
  • Reframe the virus outbreak by temporal distancing, or by focusing your attention on a longer timescale.
  • Try putting the outbreak in historical context (there have been many pandemics during our history).
  • Limit how much information you consume about the new virus outbreak. Find the right balance between being informed and being overwhelmed.

Stress-Reducing Activities

  • Try meditation or any anxiety-busting method that works for you.
  • Look for things that are future-oriented and pleasurable.
  • Do tasks around the house you have been putting off.
  • Think of activities you can still do with your loved ones, even if you can't be with them physically.

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Doomscrolling
Doomscrolling

This is a term that describes the habit of endlessly scrolling social media and news feeds full of doom and gloom on one’s smartphone screen, something which is eroding our mental health.

The Threat Cycle

One feels anxious and wants to hook the mind back to the doom and threat cycle, to gather more information.

The more time we spend doomscrolling, the more dangers and threats we stumble upon, skewing our perspective of the outside world.

Ways To Temper The Doom
  1. Set A Timer: Your social media and news feeds can be timed using the built-in utilities of the smartphone that shut off the app for the day after a certain time.
  2. Stay On Focus: Stay aware while you fire up your smartphone for what you are looking for, and refrain yourself from getting distracted towards the assortment of notifications and enticing app icons.
  3. Positive Emotions: Instead of focussing on ‘doom and gloom’, try to default towards the good, like connecting with friends and loved ones, or reading something that makes you laugh, and sending it to friends.
Panic Buying
Panic Buying

The world is seeing panic buying in supermarkets, with items like toilet paper, milk, soda, hand sanitizers, etc. flying off the shelves, especially in places with confirmed cases of the virus.

...
Downsides of Panic Buying
  • Panic buying makes people feel in charge of the situation, while seemingly mundane measures like hand-washing, which are actually impactful, seem ordinary.
  • The problem comes when people overbuy in their over-panicked state of mind (irrational stockpiling), making the shortages worse than they really are.
  • Speculators also take advantage of panic buying and raise prices of essential items like face masks, forcing companies to take appropriate measures.
Loss Aversion

..is a principle which makes people do things so that they don't feel regretful later. 

People are panic-buying for the same reason too, with social media and news media amplifying the sense of scarcity.

one more idea

The Infectious Disease Spreads

As a Pandemic spreads across the world, countries have initiated lockdowns, closing schools and non-essential businesses, leaving most of us at home.


Protecting Ourselves From...

Elders

Elders and anyone with a compromised immune system have to be taken care of by limiting direct contact with them while making sure any contact is done after thoroughly washing the hands. One can stay connected using text messages, phone calls or video chat, as we have to avoid visiting elders at any cost.

Being With An Exposed Person

Infected people are initially unable to realize they are, in fact, infected, as there are no symptoms. Yet they are spreading the infection to others silently.


  • It is imperative to limit contact with others in one’s household, and practice social distancing from them, in separate rooms.
  • Wash your hands regularly and maintain good hygiene.
  • Do not share utensils or household items.
  • Clean surfaces like remote controllers, handles, faucets and your phone, with mild cleaning liquids.
  • Self-quarantine is required for at least 14 days.

2 more ideas

Flattening the curve
Flattening the curve

It means that all the social distancing measures being adopted these days in many countries aren’t so much about preventing illness but rather slowing down the rate at which people get sick with...

Preventing system overload

Staying home during the pandemic helps prevent health systems from being overloaded.
Overloading hospitals can likely be averted with protective measures like closing schools, canceling mass gatherings, working from home, self-quarantine, self-isolation, avoiding crowds. All these keep the virus from spreading fast.

The quick rise

Slack makes it possible for tens of millions of employees to have online conversations, ask questions, share information, make decisions. The platform reproduces the culture of the open-plan office...

Slack became indispensable

Investors had been wary of Slack since it went public in June 2019 because of its slowing growth, lack of profitability, and competition from Microsoft's competing product called Teams.

But as business swerved to avoid contagion, people were flocking to Slack's product to cope with disaster. Slack became a critical service, like Wi-Fi or electricity.

Work from home

Although Slack also runs on Slack, the company had a work-at-office culture. As the company closed its offices in March, the executive made a series of decisions to make its mission clearer: Slack would take care of its people first during this crisis. In turn, those employees would take care of their customers.

  • They offered to reimburse each employee up to $500 for whatever equipment they needed to do their jobs at home.
  • When the schools closed, they advised people to work when they could.
  • They encouraged their employees to log out and take care of their kids and families.
  • They offer to pay employees their full salaries.

one more idea

The habit of shaking hands

Taking into account the current situation created by the new virus, disease experts state that we should all consider removing handshakes from our habits from now on, as they could only increase th...

Giving up on handshakes

While shaking hands reveals the need to connect with the other and be socially engaged, several disease experts are encouraging us to find a substitute that would endanger less our health throughout periods of pandemics and not only. For instance, greetings such as simply stating how much of a pleasure it is to meet a person could actually do the trick.

Adapting our social habits

While disease experts support the idea of removing the handshakes from our cultural customs, several University professors claim that individuals are surely able to adept their customs, even if these have been practiced for generations to come. Therefore, giving up or just adjusting the handshake, should be no major issue for our civilization.

A panic attack

The current pandemic is affecting the entire globe. As a result, many people may be experiencing panic attacks for the first time.

A panic attack happens suddenly, with short-lived disabl...

The body's response

A perceived threat may activate the body's physiological "fight or flight" response, similar to what your body would do if you're near a tiger. Your heart starts racing and pumping blood, so your muscles have the fuel to run or fight. 

Panic attacks are relatively common. One in four Americans will have at least one panic attack in their lives. But the pandemic seems to be causing many people to suffer panic attacks within a short time.

Panic attack symptoms

The tightening of the chest and breathing difficulties are often confused for symptoms of the new virus.

Panic attacks come on suddenly and typically last only 15 to 20 minutes, while symptoms of the virus emerge over a few days. With the virus, you will also have other symptoms, like a fever and a cough.

one more idea

Anxiety encourages us to shop
Anxiety encourages us to shop

Throughout time research has proven that shopping enables individuals to relax and forget about their worries. 

Anxiety is one of the most often met reasons that make people choose shopp...

Anxiety and panic buying

Feeling anxious can lead to quite harmful behaviors, as one tends to always choose the safe path. 

For instance, when stressed over a certain situation directly related to goods, you might feel the need to buy too many products, a fact which, over time, will result in others not having what to buy or you having bought too much and wasting the very products you bought.

Anxiety and the need to buy luxury goods

When faced with difficult periods, like the pandemic we are all dealing with at present, individuals seem to tend to associate luxury goods to a greater safety level. 

Furthermore, research has shown that people believe to be able to distance themselves from danger only by purchasing luxurious and expensive products.

one more idea

Changes you may see

If and when you return to your office after the pandemic, you'll probably notice some changes.

  • The doors of the building may open automatically, so you don't have to touch the handl...
Working from home

Before the pandemic, only 4 percent of the US workforce worked from home at least half the time. However, the trend of working from home had been gaining momentum for years.

It is estimated that within a couple of years, 30% of people will work from home multiple days per week.

Continued remote work
  • Before the pandemic, a lot of company management and leaders were skeptical regarding remote work. But the skepticism will go away because companies recognize that remote work does work.
  • The economic impact of the pandemic will likely force employers to cut costs. They may reduce their rent by letting workers work from home instead of layoffs.
  • Employers had to spend money on new technology and equipment to work from home - a departure from the norm.
  • Employees themselves are also spending more money to create better home offices.

4 more ideas

Times Of Anxiety

The virus outbreak has people stirred up in anxiety, with canceling of travel plans and events the world over. 

In this ongoing public health emergency, it is easy to overreact, as t...

Coping With Anxiety

Fear of the unknown, causing anxiety, can be helped by deep breaths or just a reminder that uncertainty is a part of life.

Practicing mindfulness (or meditation), focusing on the present moment, can relieve symptoms of anxiety.

Bad News And Social Media

Too much panic-inducing news can cause unnecessary alarm and anxiety. It is advisable to stay clear of fake news and implausible claims on social media.

At the same time, it is also important to know the essential updates, like the recommended social distancing and events being canceled.

one more idea