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The Johari Window: Creating Better Understanding Between Individuals and Groups

Explaining the Johari Window

Explaining the Johari Window

The model consists of a foursquare grid. Each person is represented by their own four-quadrants. Each of these contains and represents personal information, like feelings and motivation, and shows if the information is known or not known.

  • Quadrant 1: Open Area. What is known by the person about him/herself and is also known by others.
  • Quadrant 2: Blind Area. What is unknown by the person about him/herself but which can be seen by others. (for example, feelings of incompetence, rejection)
  • Quadrant 3: Hidden or Avoided Area. What the person knows about him/herself that others don't know.
  • Quadrant 4: Unknown Area. What is unknown by the person about him/herself and also unknown by others.

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The Johari Window: Creating Better Understanding Between Individuals and Groups

The Johari Window: Creating Better Understanding Between Individuals and Groups

https://medium.com/@Favournella/the-johari-window-creating-better-understanding-between-individuals-and-groups-b39262ceed34

medium.com

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Key Ideas

The Johari Window

It is a communication model used to improve understanding between individuals within a team or group setting.

There are two key ideas:

  • Individuals can build trust by disclosing information about themselves.
  • Individuals can learn about themselves and come to terms with personal issues with the help of feedback from others.

Explaining the Johari Window

The model consists of a foursquare grid. Each person is represented by their own four-quadrants. Each of these contains and represents personal information, like feelings and motivation, and shows if the information is known or not known.

  • Quadrant 1: Open Area. What is known by the person about him/herself and is also known by others.
  • Quadrant 2: Blind Area. What is unknown by the person about him/herself but which can be seen by others. (for example, feelings of incompetence, rejection)
  • Quadrant 3: Hidden or Avoided Area. What the person knows about him/herself that others don't know.
  • Quadrant 4: Unknown Area. What is unknown by the person about him/herself and also unknown by others.

Self-disclosure

  • Don't disclose information that could damage people's respect for you.
  • Be careful in the way you give feedback. Some are very open and accepting while others are not. If you are interested in learning more about an individual, reciprocate by sharing information of your hidden self.

A Team Context

It is in the Open Area where good communications and cooperation occur. Established team members will have larger open areas than new team members. Group members should strive to assist a team member in widening their Open Area. They can do this in the following manner:

  • By offering constructive feedback.
  • The sender can disclose information, feelings, etc about him/herself.
  • Group members can ask the sender about himself/herself.

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Feedback
Feedback

Feedback provides an opportunity to gain insights about a person's personal and professional actions.
Without feedback, we will move in the same direction without realizing our shortcomings. ...

Types of feedback
  • Positive vs. negative. Positive feedback confirms that someone is taking good action, while negative feedback shows what actions need to be corrected.
  • Formal vs. informal. Formal feedback is given on a set schedule, and informal feedback is short and follows after an action or event.
  • Annual vs. monthly
  • Verbal vs. written
  • Manager vs. peer
Effective feedback
Effective feedback is:
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  • Timely. Feedback should follow when the event is still fresh.
  • Constructive. Give respect and show that you have their best interests in mind.
  • Actionable. Feedback must include immediate next steps.
  • Warranted. Give your employees room for mistakes and learn from them.

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When to Use Icebreakers

Consider using an ice breaker when:

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  • People need to bond quickly so as to work towards a common goal.
  • Your team ...
The "ice" that needs to be broken

When designing your ice breaker, think about the "ice" that needs to be broken.

  • If you are bringing together like-minded people, the "ice" may simply reflect the fact that people have not yet met.
  • If you are bringing together people of different backgrounds, cultures, and outlooks for work within your community, then the "ice" may come from people's perceptions of each other.

Designing Your Ice Breaker
  • Make sure that the activity is specifically focused on meeting your objectives and appropriate to the group of people involved.
  • Clarify the specific objectives for your session.
  • Ask yourself questions about how you will meet your objectives
  • These questions can be used as a checklist once you have designed the session
  • As a further check, ask yourself how each person is likely to react to the session.

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Nonviolent communication

It lets us reframe how we express ourselves and hear others. 

It allows us to speak in terms of what we observe, how we’re feeling, what our needs are, and how we respond to other...

The objective of nonviolent communication

Is to empower functional giving and receiving. 

If implemented correctly, it can replace knee-jerk reactions and old, ineffective patterns. It can be built like any habit.

Observation
  • Take a mental step back and just watch what's happening in the current situation.
  • Record these observations in your mind without assigning value to them
  • Hold back from judgment or evaluation
  • Say what you see, but not what you think of it. Examples: “What I’m hearing you ask me is…” or “I see that you want this…”

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Team communication
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Effects of poor communication
  • Instead of looking for solutions, we waste time checking communication tools.
  • We don't talk about our expectations.
  • Communication bleeds into our out-of-work time, instead of leaving it at work.
Open communication

It doesn’t mean just telling people to share their thoughts, but actually doing it yourself and setting clear rules and guidelines about how to share.

It isn’t just about how you share information but also what gets shared. 

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“Be A Strong Writer”
“Be A Strong Writer”

This is one of the first pieces of advice people give to those seeking remote work.

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Accessible Language
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Be Clear And Concise
  • Do not obscure your message by words that are there to decorate the sentence and make it sound wordy while camouflaging what you mean.
  • Make good use of qualifiers ("I think, In my opinion") while not coming across as a perpetually confused person. Don’t use qualifiers while making a strong point.
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  • Use complete words and sentences. Shortcuts and acronyms block any actual communication, acting as roadblocks. On the same lines, avoid cliches, idioms and any idiotic sounding phrase that catches the ear well but doesn’t really do any good to anyone.
  • Remote working is often on a global scale, and certain expressions will not be understood by some participants, or worse, will be misunderstood.
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A great way to do that is by having excellent conversation starters handy:What was the...

Be emotionally curious

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Everyone wants to be liked, loved and accepted. When you fulfill that need for others, you are perceived as being influential.

Use high-powered body language

When you manifest powerful body language, you are seen as more influential. 

The head is held high, the arms are loose, the shoulders are set back and the chest is out. Confident body language not only affects the way others see you but also the way you see yourself. 

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Love sets the stage
Love sets the stage

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The neurobiology of affiliation is the new scientific field that describes the neural, endocrine, and behavioral systems sustaining our capacity to love. There are three factors in the neurobiology of bonding:

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Oxytocin - a large molecule produced by neurons in the hypothalamus - is known for coordinating bonding, sociality, and group living. Oxytocin targets mainly the amygdala, a center for fear and vigilance, the hippocampus, and the striatum, a locus of motivation and reward.

Oxytocin is released through the central part of the neuron as well as its extensions, called dendrites. The dendrites increase oxytocin release whenever attachment memories are used and prime us for a lifetime. Early attachment memories help us move without fear. It imprints the infant's brain with distinct social patterns.

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Moreover, getting their feedback both before and after the trip might lead to the improvement of such activities.

Parent mentor programs

This kind of program often results in successful cooperation between parents and teachers, therefore ensuring that no feedback is lost. 

Parent volunteers get in contact with other parents for topics related to their children and forward their opinions to teachers, enabling an efficient communication of everybody's thoughts and suggestions.

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Hackathon

A hackathon is an intensive, often software-centric, ideation, prototyping and presentation challenge on known or unknown problems or opportunities.

It is a design sprint-li...

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The most important though from a developer’s point of view is resources and sponsorship to drive the product/idea to the next stage. This could be the most inspiring award of all — the winners ability to use specialized resources (developers, equipment, software, services) — according to a suitable plan — and get prepared for a formal presentation of the outcome to the senior stakeholders, leaders and decision makers. 

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Keep a list of three potential topics ready for discussion. When they say they have nothing to discuss, you can jumpstart the conversation with one of your items.

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