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The Johari Window: Creating Better Understanding Between Individuals and Groups

Explaining the Johari Window

Explaining the Johari Window

The model consists of a foursquare grid. Each person is represented by their own four-quadrants. Each of these contains and represents personal information, like feelings and motivation, and shows if the information is known or not known.

  • Quadrant 1: Open Area. What is known by the person about him/herself and is also known by others.
  • Quadrant 2: Blind Area. What is unknown by the person about him/herself but which can be seen by others. (for example, feelings of incompetence, rejection)
  • Quadrant 3: Hidden or Avoided Area. What the person knows about him/herself that others don't know.
  • Quadrant 4: Unknown Area. What is unknown by the person about him/herself and also unknown by others.

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The Johari Window: Creating Better Understanding Between Individuals and Groups

The Johari Window: Creating Better Understanding Between Individuals and Groups

https://medium.com/@Favournella/the-johari-window-creating-better-understanding-between-individuals-and-groups-b39262ceed34

medium.com

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Key Ideas

The Johari Window

It is a communication model used to improve understanding between individuals within a team or group setting.

There are two key ideas:

  • Individuals can build trust by disclosing information about themselves.
  • Individuals can learn about themselves and come to terms with personal issues with the help of feedback from others.

Explaining the Johari Window

The model consists of a foursquare grid. Each person is represented by their own four-quadrants. Each of these contains and represents personal information, like feelings and motivation, and shows if the information is known or not known.

  • Quadrant 1: Open Area. What is known by the person about him/herself and is also known by others.
  • Quadrant 2: Blind Area. What is unknown by the person about him/herself but which can be seen by others. (for example, feelings of incompetence, rejection)
  • Quadrant 3: Hidden or Avoided Area. What the person knows about him/herself that others don't know.
  • Quadrant 4: Unknown Area. What is unknown by the person about him/herself and also unknown by others.

Self-disclosure

  • Don't disclose information that could damage people's respect for you.
  • Be careful in the way you give feedback. Some are very open and accepting while others are not. If you are interested in learning more about an individual, reciprocate by sharing information of your hidden self.

A Team Context

It is in the Open Area where good communications and cooperation occur. Established team members will have larger open areas than new team members. Group members should strive to assist a team member in widening their Open Area. They can do this in the following manner:

  • By offering constructive feedback.
  • The sender can disclose information, feelings, etc about him/herself.
  • Group members can ask the sender about himself/herself.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Feedback
Feedback

Feedback provides an opportunity to gain insights about a person's personal and professional actions.
Without feedback, we will move in the same direction without realizing our shortcomings. ...

Types of feedback
  • Positive vs. negative. Positive feedback confirms that someone is taking good action, while negative feedback shows what actions need to be corrected.
  • Formal vs. informal. Formal feedback is given on a set schedule, and informal feedback is short and follows after an action or event.
  • Annual vs. monthly
  • Verbal vs. written
  • Manager vs. peer
Effective feedback
Effective feedback is:
  • Objective. Don't let your personal feelings get in the way.
  • Timely. Feedback should follow when the event is still fresh.
  • Constructive. Give respect and show that you have their best interests in mind.
  • Actionable. Feedback must include immediate next steps.
  • Warranted. Give your employees room for mistakes and learn from them.

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Team communication
  • Open and effective team communication keeps projects moving, co-workers happy, and ideas flowing.
  • Bad team communication kills company culture,  leads employees...
Effects of poor communication
  • Instead of looking for solutions, we waste time checking communication tools.
  • We don't talk about our expectations.
  • Communication bleeds into our out-of-work time, instead of leaving it at work.
Open communication

It doesn’t mean just telling people to share their thoughts, but actually doing it yourself and setting clear rules and guidelines about how to share.

It isn’t just about how you share information but also what gets shared. 

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When to Use Icebreakers

Consider using an ice breaker when:

  • Participants come from different backgrounds.
  • People need to bond quickly so as to work towards a common goal.
  • Your team ...
The "ice" that needs to be broken

When designing your ice breaker, think about the "ice" that needs to be broken.

  • If you are bringing together like-minded people, the "ice" may simply reflect the fact that people have not yet met.
  • If you are bringing together people of different backgrounds, cultures, and outlooks for work within your community, then the "ice" may come from people's perceptions of each other.

Designing Your Ice Breaker
  • Make sure that the activity is specifically focused on meeting your objectives and appropriate to the group of people involved.
  • Clarify the specific objectives for your session.
  • Ask yourself questions about how you will meet your objectives
  • These questions can be used as a checklist once you have designed the session
  • As a further check, ask yourself how each person is likely to react to the session.

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