Benefits of talking out problems - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

Get an account to save ideas & make your own & organize them how you wish.

deepstash

Beta

Why Talking About Our Problems Helps So Much (and How to Do It)

Benefits of talking out problems

Research shows that putting your feelings into words can diminish the response of the amygdala (the part of the brain that handles your fight or flight response, among other things) when you encounter things that are upsetting. 

This in time makes you react with less stress when faced with the things that bother you.

140 SAVES


This is a professional note extracted from an online article.

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

Why Talking About Our Problems Helps So Much (and How to Do It)

Why Talking About Our Problems Helps So Much (and How to Do It)

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/03/smarter-living/talking-out-problems.html

nytimes.com

4

Key Ideas

Difficulties in reaching out

There are a lot of reasons talking about our problems can be difficult:

  • We may be educated to internalize feelings, rather than expressing them.
  • The emotions we're dealing with (guilt or shame) can feel so overwhelming that we can’t get up the motivation to talk about them.

Talking about our problems

It can take a few forms:

  • Venting to a trusted friend: just let your feelings out, with no real plan for a solution.
  • Discussing a conflict with a partner: being able to be open about your feelings with your partner can make your communication healthier.
  • Talk therapy with a licensed therapist: a good one can help you hash out your emotions.
  • Being open about your struggles: sharing what daily life is like can help you and others with the same struggles realize that you’re not alone.

Benefits of talking out problems

Research shows that putting your feelings into words can diminish the response of the amygdala (the part of the brain that handles your fight or flight response, among other things) when you encounter things that are upsetting. 

This in time makes you react with less stress when faced with the things that bother you.

Constructive discussions

  • Choose the right people to talk to. And if you need a lot of talk time, try spreading your conversations out to multiple people.
  • Choose the right time to talk. Your friends may want to support you, but they have their own lives.
  • Find a therapist. If you have misconceptions about it, think of it less like seeing a doctor and more like a personal trainer.
  • Give yourself an endpoint. You may not be able to fix the external problem that is bothering you, but the goal should at least be to improve your mood about it.
  • Talk about the good as well as the bad. Be sure to share your good experiences and feelings when they come up. 

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Dreams as therapists

Your dreams may be ways of confronting emotional dramas...

Fight-or-flight training

One of the areas of the brain that’s most active during dreaming is the amygdala - the part of the brain associated with the survival instinct and the fight-or-flight response.

One theory suggests dreams may be the brain’s way of getting you ready to deal with a threat. Fortunately, the brainstem sends out nerve signals during REM sleep that relax your muscles. That way you don’t try to run or punch in your sleep.

Dreams as your muse

One theory for why we dream is that it helps facilitate our creative tendencies. 

Without the logic filter, you might normally use in your waking life that can restrict your creative flow, your thoughts and ideas have no restrictions when you’re sleeping.

6 more ideas

Reappraising Conversations
Imagining a conversation as a game you are to score as many points as you can. 
6: Shared feeling/experience (that’s when acquaintances become friends)
5: Confirmation of an emotion’s legi...
Don’t Be Self-Centered

It’s key to connecting with people to suspend your ego; to put your own needs, wants and opinions aside. Anxiety does the opposite bringing your feelings and expectations to the forefront.

Focus on the other person. Simply listen to what they have to say and ask them to tell you more. 

Reappraisal

Just because you feel it doesn’t make it real. Feelings come from beliefs. Change the beliefs and feelings will change.

Research and anecdotal evidence show that the simple act of positively reimagining something can be enough to decrease anxiety.

2 more ideas

Emotions During a Difficult Conversation

It’s hard not to get worked up emotionally when you’re in a tense conversation: a disagreement can feel like a threat.

But if your body goes into “fight or flight” mode,  ...

Breathe

When you start noticing yourself getting tense, try to focus on breathing (on feeling the air coming in and out of your lungs).

This will take your attention off the physical signs of panic and keep you centered.

Focus on your body

Sitting still when you’re having a difficult conversation can make the emotions build up rather than dissipate. 

Standing up and walking around helps to activate the thinking part of your brain.

3 more ideas

Stop And Breathe

Anxiety is typically experienced as worrying about a future or past event. But anxiety loses its grip when you clear your mind of worry and bring your awareness back to the present.

When a...

A Simple Breathing Technique
  • Sit in a comfortable position.
  • Close your eyes and inhale slowly through your nose.
  • Exhale deeply.
  • Continue to breathe deeply and fully. Allow your breath to be a guide to the present.
  • With each breath in, think to yourself “be” and with each breath out, focus on the word “present. ”
Figure Out What's Bothering You

The physical symptoms of panic and anxiety, such as trembling, chest pain, and rapid heartbeat, are more obvious than the reason you are anxious. But, to get to the root of your anxiety, you need to stop and think about your thoughts and feelings.

Writing all that bothers you or talking with a friend can help you understand your anxious feelings.

3 more ideas

Learn To Relax

You cannot possibly feel anxious when you are in a state of relaxation. Try: 

  • Progressive muscle relaxation
  • Meditation
  • Yoga
  • Visualiza...
Turn Your Thoughts Around

Worry is often a learned negative thinking pattern that can be contributing to your panic disorder symptoms. Since negative thinking typically develops over time, it can be unlearned and replaced with more positive views.

To do that, recognize and record your worries throughout the day, think it they are realistic and replace these negative thoughts with more realistic statements.

Journal Through It

By writing in a journal, you can work through your difficult emotions, uncover solutions to your issues, and change your perceptions and worries.

Getting started in journal writing can be a simple as a dedicated time each day to write down your inner thoughts. 

3 more ideas

High-pressure moments as a (fun) challenge

Most people see "pressure situations" as threatening, and that makes them perform even less well. 

But, "when you see the ...

One of many opportunities

Is this high-pressure situation a good opportunity? Sure. Is it the only opportunity you will ever have for the rest of your life? Probably not.

Before an interview or a big meeting, give yourself a pep talk: "I will have other interviews" (or presentations or sales calls). 

Focus on the task

Instead of worrying about the outcome, worry about the task at hand.

That means developing tunnel vision. When you keep your eye on the task at hand (and only the task at hand), all you can see is the concrete steps necessary to excel.

9 more ideas

Why food

Negative emotions may lead to a feeling of emptiness or an emotional void. 

Food is believed to be a way to fill that void and create a false feeling of “

Emotional vs. true hunger

Physical hunger

  • It develops slowly over time.
  • You desire a variety of food groups.
  • You feel the sensation of fullness and take it as a cue to stop eating.
  • You have no negative feelings about eating.

Emotional hunger

  • It comes about suddenly or abruptly.
  • You crave only certain foods.
  • You may binge on food and not feel a sensation of fullness.
  • You feel guilt or shame about eating.
Emotional hunger isn’t easily quelled

While filling up could work in the moment, eating because of negative emotions often leaves people feeling more upset than before.

This cycle typically doesn’t end until a person addresses emotional needs head-on.

10 more ideas

Use Aromatherapy

Whether they’re in oil form, incense, or a candle, scents like lavender, chamomile, and sandalwood can be very soothing.

Aromatherapy is thought to help activate certain receptors in your ...

Go For a Walk Or Do Yoga

Walking away from an anxiety inducing situation can be very effective. Taking some time to focus on your body and not your mind may help relieve your anxiety.

Write Down Your Thoughts

Writing down what’s making you anxious gets it out of your head and can make it less daunting.

12 more ideas

When pain is useful
When pain is useful

Pain tells us when something is wrong. It also protects us. If you shut your hand in the car door, your hand will hurt will swell up. The resulting inflammation is part of the heal...

The migraine

The hallmark of the migraine attack is a wave of excitation across the brain quickly followed by a wave of inactivity.

The neurochemical changes associated with these waves cause the blood vessels to narrow in the head. Since a lack of blood-flow in the head can be deadly, our body reacts with a massive blood vessel dilation in response. The heightened activity in your brain means you will have trouble moving, thinking, remembering things, and photophobia. In effect, migraines shut us down until the neurchemical balance is restored.

Three types of migraine
  • The classic migraine. Some notice it as an 'aura' - the sensory disturbance might be visual or feel like pins and needles.
  • The common migraine is without the auras.
  • An ocular migraine is when you experience the aura without the pain.

3 more ideas

Untreated trauma and its negative effects

All individual who has ever dealt with trauma knows that healing can take a lot of time if it eventually happens. Untreated trauma seems to leave scars on our brain, altering the way we perceive...

Trauma changes our brain

After having experienced trauma, our brain can not function properly anymore, at least for a while. 

Among the negative effects that trauma leads to there is the risk of developing physical illnesses or the so-called Post-traumatic stress disorder.

Post-traumatic stress disorder

When dealing with PTSD, the three parts of our brain, which are responsible for processing stress, suffer changes: the hippocampus, the amygdala function and the prefrontal/ anterior cingulate function.

one more idea