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How Neuroscientists Explain the Mind-Clearing Magic of Running

A clear mind

A clear mind

Running never fails to clear your head. Do you have to make a potentially life-altering decision? Go for a run. Are you feeling mad or sad? Go for a run.

A run can sometimes make you feel like a brand-new person. Research in neuroscience found a link between aerobic exercise and subsequent cognitive clarity.

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