The “First 15 Minutes” checklist - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

Get an account to save ideas & make your own & organize them how you wish.

deepstash

Beta

You Have 15 Minutes To Respond To A Crisis: A Checklist of Dos And Don'ts

The “First 15 Minutes” checklist

The “First 15 Minutes” crisis management checklist:

  • focus on the current matter.
  • become the trusted voice in this crisis. Designate a crisis team.
  • monitor in real-time what the media has to say on the topic.
  • get a deeper understanding of the scope of the issue and the vital decisions to be made.
  • prepare an initial 'holding statement' in order to make your opinion pubic. Make sure the statement goes viral fast.
  • document well before speaking publicly. 
  • show humanity, compassion, and concern for any human toll – and mean it. 

  • follow up on everything that you have engaged yourself to fulfill.

86 SAVES


This is a professional note extracted from an online article.

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

You Have 15 Minutes To Respond To A Crisis: A Checklist of Dos And Don'ts

You Have 15 Minutes To Respond To A Crisis: A Checklist of Dos And Don'ts

https://www.forbes.com/sites/daviatemin/2015/08/06/you-have-15-minutes-to-respond-to-a-crisis-a-checklist-of-dos-and-donts/

forbes.com

3

Key Ideas

Leaders in a time of crisis

As a leader, when facing a crisis, you have to adopt the best position in order to ensure the efficiency of your action. And, most importantly, this action has to be taken as fast as possible. 

The first 15 minutes after having found out about a crisis, you should be ready to provide a solution.

The “First 15 Minutes” checklist

The “First 15 Minutes” crisis management checklist:

  • focus on the current matter.
  • become the trusted voice in this crisis. Designate a crisis team.
  • monitor in real-time what the media has to say on the topic.
  • get a deeper understanding of the scope of the issue and the vital decisions to be made.
  • prepare an initial 'holding statement' in order to make your opinion pubic. Make sure the statement goes viral fast.
  • document well before speaking publicly. 
  • show humanity, compassion, and concern for any human toll – and mean it. 

  • follow up on everything that you have engaged yourself to fulfill.

Don'ts for times of crisis

Dealing with a crisis increases the risk of taking bad decisions. When times get harder:

  • don't lie, minimize the situation or make jokes regarding the crisis.
  • don't run away from your responsibilities.
  • don't hurry to issue a denial unless you have all the facts.
  • make positive statements when talking about the matter, rather than negative ones.
  • don’t let your fears of liability trump your humanity.
  • don’t speculate until you fully understand the situation.

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

5 Steps for Effective Crisis Negotiation
  • Prepare for crisis: Good crisis-management plans predict and set mechanisms to deal with and minimize the effects of disputes.
  • Establish ground...
Characteristics of Crisis Negotiation
  • High stakes, including communication towards conflict resolution.
  • Unpredictable.
  • Heightened negative emotions, often leading to conflict escalation.
  • Multiple parties and teams are involved.
Dealing with a crisis

A crisis can strike any company anytime, anywhere. Advanced planning is the key to survival.
Before a crisis strikes, business owners should think about how a disaster would impact employees...

Crisis management
  • Have a plan that includes specific actions that will be taken in the event of a crisis.
  • Identify a spokesperson and prepared them to deal with the public and the media.
  • Be honest and open.
  • Always inform your employees. This keeps the business flowing smoothly.
  • Communicate with customers and suppliers.
  • Over-communicate. A lack of updates will allow rumors to fill the void.
  • Be sure to establish a social media team to monitor, post and react to social media activity throughout the crisis.
Slow down

Try not to react immediately, but be patient and gather as much information as possible.

If the problem will not matter a year from now, distance yourself somewhat from the situation to gain ...

Stay positive

When you are in a stressful situation, do not allow your mind to imagine the worst-case scenario. 

Focus your mind on something positive.

Never ask “what if?”

The "what if" line of questioning induces panic and lets you focus on imagined situations that escalate the problem.

Focus on the facts and work on a solution.

5 more ideas

For decision-making success:
  1. Book time to think: It’s counterintuitive, but making decisions faster requires consciously giving yourself time to make them.
  2. Define the decision: Before delving into de...
Fall back on your values

Having clear values that you try to live by can make tough decisions easier.

For example, maybe you know there’s a certain amount of time you want to spend with your family, or a baseline level of debt you’re willing to carry.

Talk it through

You don’t need to speak with someone who’s knowledgeable on the topic. 

You just need a good listener who’ll give you time and space to hear out your monologue and occasionally reflect back to you what you’ve shared.

3 more ideas

The Data Scientist presentation style

The Data Scientist uses data, analytics, facts, and figures to make his point and persuade the audience. 

Pros: This presentation style delivers data, information and analy...

The Storyteller presentation style

The Storyteller can tap emotions and weave a persuasive narrative.

An audience may not remember every single data point or statistic, but they will remember a great story or emotional connection.

Pros: Focused on making an emotional connection with the audience.

Cons: Not suitable for audiences that just want a factual answer to a simple question.

The Closer presentation style

The Closer jumps into a presentation, cuts right to the chase, delivers the bottom line and skips all the boring stuff.

It sees the end goal and goes right for it. 

Pros: reduces a presentation to its esssence.

Cons: may be perceived as too harsh or abrupt.

one more idea

Personal Or Core Values

They are what you consider most important in your life, literally what you “value. ” They are broad concepts that can be applied across a wide range of circumstances, as opposed to narrow answers t...

The Benefits Of Having a Core Value
  • Having a core values list helps you make better decisions. The decisions you make come more quickly and efficiently than they would without it.
  • Being unconscious of your core values makes you likely to keep repeating the same mistakes.
Creating a List Of Personal Values

The core values that are most valuable to each of us come from our own personal experience, not from being taught.

As you put them into practice you’ll get better at internalizing these values and they’ll express themselves subconsciously with smaller decisions, as well.

4 more ideas

71% of Americans

....sleep next to their smartphones. 

It makes it much harder to go back to sleep,  since the blue light emitted acts as a stimulant. 

Arianna Huffington's sleep routine
  • Turn off all devices 30 minutes prior to bedtime and place them outside the bedroom.
  • Take a hot bath.
  • Use dedicated clothing (pajamas, not gym clothes).
  • Read only physical books, that have nothing to do with work.
  • End the day on a positive note (thinks or write about 3 things you are grateful for in that day).
“Work and rest are actually partners. They are like different parts of a wave. You can’t have the high without the lo..."
Alex Soojung-Kim Pang
Why we don't take time off

  • We think more work should equal more output: we see productivity not as doing more with less. But simply doing more.
  • We’re afraid of being “left behind”:  not only could we miss out on some important conversation, but we worry that we’ll be left behind.
  • Work has become a larger part of our identity: we feel personally connected to the work we do. Taking time away opens up all sorts of questions that can be hard to face. 

Deliberate rest

It is a play on the term “deliberate practice” and it means engaging with restful activities that are often vigorous and mentally engaging.

It is not a continuation of work, but a way to find activities that let you recharge from your workday, while still being mentally productive.

one more idea

Analyze vs. speculate

Assuming folded arms are a sign of lying behavior is speculation. 

Instead, consider whether the behavior is a result of your question, or possibly just nervousness.

Manage your bias

Deceptive people can flood you with truthful answers and make you believe that they are good people. 

Filter through all the information that is meant to deceive you to get to the real untruths.

Recognize evasiveness

A deceptive person will talk around the issue without actually answering the initial question. 

4 more ideas

Clarify the question

Make sure you're not assuming what you're being asked and take the  time to really understand the question.

Insert parts of the question in your answers, but never repeat the negative la...

Take thinking time

When you're faced with difficult questions, make sure you buy yourself enough time to determine how you want to respond.

Repeating of rephrasing the question could give you some extra time for thinking about how you want to answer.

Answer part of the question

Find a part of the question you are comfortable answering if answering the whole question is not an option.

This may sometimes be enough to satisfy the other person.

6 more ideas